[USC03] 46 USC Ch. 35: CARRIAGE OF PASSENGERS
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46 USC Ch. 35: CARRIAGE OF PASSENGERS
From Title 46—SHIPPINGSubtitle II—Vessels and SeamenPart B—Inspection and Regulation of Vessels

CHAPTER 35—CARRIAGE OF PASSENGERS

Sec.
3501.
Number of passengers.
3502.
List or count of passengers.
3503.
Fire-retardant materials.
3504.
Notification to passengers.
3505.
Prevention of departure.
3506.
Copies of laws.
3507.
Passenger vessel security and safety requirements.
3508.
Crime scene preservation training for passenger vessel crewmembers.

        

Historical and Revision Notes

Chapter 35 consolidates the laws that have specific application to the carriage of passengers. They provide special provisions for listing and counting the number of passengers on board a vessel, for notifying the general public of the safety standards that are applicable, and for related control measures.

Amendments

2016Pub. L. 114–120, title III, §306(a)(3), Feb. 8, 2016, 130 Stat. 54, inserted a period at end of items 3507 and 3508.

2010Pub. L. 111–207, §3(b), July 27, 2010, 124 Stat. 2251, added items 3507 and 3508.

§3501. Number of passengers

(a) Each certificate of inspection issued to a vessel carrying passengers (except a ferry) shall include a statement on the number of passengers that the vessel is permitted to carry.

(b) The owner, charterer, managing operator, agent, master, or individual in charge of a vessel is liable to a person suing them for carrying more passengers than the number of passengers permitted by the certificate of inspection in an amount equal to—

(1) passage money; and

(2) $100 for each passenger in excess of the number of passengers permitted.


(c) An owner, charterer, managing operator, agent, master, or individual in charge of a vessel that knowingly carries more passengers than the number of passengers permitted by the certificate of inspection also shall be fined not more than $100, imprisoned for not more than 30 days, or both.

(d) The vessel also is liable in rem for a penalty under this section.

(e) An offshore supply vessel may not carry passengers except in an emergency.

(Pub. L. 98–89, Aug. 26, 1983, 97 Stat. 519; Pub. L. 99–36, §1(a)(2), May 15, 1985, 99 Stat. 67.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised sectionSource section (U.S. Code)
3501 46:404–1

46:451

46:452

46:462

Section 3501 requires that a vessel carrying passengers, including a passenger vessel as well as a small passenger vessel (except a ferry), shall have on the certificate of inspection a statement as to the number of passengers the vessel is permitted to carry. It also provides penalties for carrying passengers in excess of the number permitted.

Amendments

1985—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 99–36, §1(a)(2)(A), struck out the comma after "(except a ferry)".

Subsec. (c). Pub. L. 99–36, §1(a)(2)(B), substituted "carries more passengers than the number of passengers permitted by the certificate of inspection" for "violates subsection (b) of this section".

Effective Date

Chapter effective Apr. 15, 1984, see section 2(g)(1) of Pub. L. 98–89, set out as a note under section 3101 of this title.

§3502. List or count of passengers

(a) The owner, charterer, managing operator, master, or individual in charge of the following categories of vessels carrying passengers shall keep a correct list of passengers received and delivered from day to day:

(1) vessels arriving from foreign ports (except at United States Great Lakes ports from Canadian Great Lakes ports).

(2) seagoing vessels in the coastwise trade.

(3) passenger vessels making voyages of more than 300 miles on the Great Lakes except from a Canadian to a United States port.


(b) The master of a vessel carrying passengers (except a vessel listed in subsection (a) of this section) shall keep a correct count of all passengers received and delivered.

(c) Lists and counts required under this section shall be open to the inspection of designated officials of the Coast Guard and the Customs Service at all times. The total number of passengers shall be provided to the Coast Guard when requested.

(d) This section applies to a foreign vessel arriving at a United States port.

(e) The owner, charterer, managing operator, master, or individual in charge of a passenger vessel failing to make a list or count of passengers as required by this section is liable to the United States Government for a civil penalty of $100. The vessel also is liable in rem for the penalty.

(Pub. L. 98–89, Aug. 26, 1983, 97 Stat. 519.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised sectionSource section (U.S. Code)
3502 46:460

46:460a

46:461

46:462

Section 3502 is related to section 3501 and requires the listing or counting of passengers on certain vessels. This requirement applies to large as well as small passenger vessels when operating on the types of voyages enumerated. This section also applies to a foreign vessel arriving at a port or place in the United States.

Transfer of Functions

For transfer of authorities, functions, personnel, and assets of the Coast Guard, including the authorities and functions of the Secretary of Transportation relating thereto, to the Department of Homeland Security, and for treatment of related references, see sections 468(b), 551(d), 552(d), and 557 of Title 6, Domestic Security, and the Department of Homeland Security Reorganization Plan of November 25, 2002, as modified, set out as a note under section 542 of Title 6.

For transfer of functions, personnel, assets, and liabilities of the United States Customs Service of the Department of the Treasury, including functions of the Secretary of the Treasury relating thereto, to the Secretary of Homeland Security, and for treatment of related references, see sections 203(1), 551(d), 552(d), and 557 of Title 6, Domestic Security, and the Department of Homeland Security Reorganization Plan of November 25, 2002, as modified, set out as a note under section 542 of Title 6. For establishment of U.S. Customs and Border Protection in the Department of Homeland Security, treated as if included in Pub. L. 107–296 as of Nov. 25, 2002, see section 211 of Title 6, as amended generally by Pub. L. 114–125, and section 802(b) of Pub. L. 114–125, set out as a note under section 211 of Title 6.

§3503. Fire-retardant materials

(a) A passenger vessel of the United States having berth or stateroom accommodations for at least 50 passengers shall be granted a certificate of inspection only if the vessel is constructed of fire-retardant materials. Before November 1, 2008, this section does not apply to any vessel in operation before January 1, 1968, and operating only within the Boundary Line.

(b)(1) When a vessel is exempted from the fire-retardant standards of this section—

(A) the owner or managing operator of the vessel shall notify prospective passengers that the vessel does not comply with applicable fire safety standards due primarily to the wooden construction of passenger berthing areas;

(B) the owner or managing operator of the vessel may not disclaim liability to a passenger for death, injury, or any other loss caused by fire due to the negligence of the owner or managing operator;

(C) the penalties provided in section 3504(c) of this title apply to a violation of this subsection; and

(D) the owner or managing operator of the vessel shall notify the Coast Guard of structural alterations to the vessel, and with regard to those alterations comply with any noncombustible material requirements that the Coast Guard prescribes for nonpublic spaces. Coast Guard requirements shall be consistent with preservation of the historic integrity of the vessel in areas carrying or accessible to passengers or generally visible to the public.


(2) The Secretary shall prescribe regulations under this subsection on the manner in which prospective passengers are to be notified.

(Pub. L. 98–89, Aug. 26, 1983, 97 Stat. 519; Pub. L. 99–307, §1(7)(A), May 19, 1986, 100 Stat. 445; Pub. L. 102–241, §20, Dec. 19, 1991, 105 Stat. 2216; Pub. L. 104–324, title XI, §1133, Oct. 19, 1996, 110 Stat. 3985.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised sectionSource section (U.S. Code)
3503 46:369(b)

Section 3503 requires the use of fire retardant materials on a vessel having berthing facilities for at least 50 passengers. This requirement in the case of vessels engaged in foreign trade is consistent with our international treaty obligations, which impose extensive and additional fire safety standards. A waiver that grandfathers existing inland river passenger vessels is also included.

Amendments

1996—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 104–324 substituted "Before November 1, 2008, this section does not apply to any vessel in operation before January 1, 1968, and operating only within the Boundary Line." for "Before November 1, 1998, this section does not apply to a vessel in operation before January 1, 1968, and operating only on the inland rivers."

1991—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 102–241, §20(1), substituted "1998" for "1993".

Subsec. (b)(1)(D). Pub. L. 102–241, §20(2), added subpar. (D).

1986Pub. L. 99–307 designated existing provision as subsec. (a), substituted "November 1, 1993" for "November 1, 1988" and inserted "in operation before January 1, 1968, and" after "to a vessel", and added subsec. (b).

Transfer of Functions

For transfer of authorities, functions, personnel, and assets of the Coast Guard, including the authorities and functions of the Secretary of Transportation relating thereto, to the Department of Homeland Security, and for treatment of related references, see sections 468(b), 551(d), 552(d), and 557 of Title 6, Domestic Security, and the Department of Homeland Security Reorganization Plan of November 25, 2002, as modified, set out as a note under section 542 of Title 6.

Notification to Prospective Passengers of Noncompliance With Fire-Retardant Standards

Pub. L. 99–307, §1(7)(B), May 19, 1986, 100 Stat. 445, provided that: "Until the regulations required by subclause (A) of this clause [see subsec. (b)(2) of this section] become effective, the owner or managing operator shall notify prospective passengers in all promotional literature and on each ticket that the vessel does not comply with those standards due primarily to the wooden construction of passenger berthing areas."

§3504. Notification to passengers

(a) A person selling passage on a foreign or domestic passenger vessel having berth or stateroom accommodations for at least 50 passengers and embarking passengers at United States ports for a coastwise or an international voyage shall notify each prospective passenger of the safety standards applicable to the vessel in a manner prescribed by regulation.

(b) All promotional literature or advertising through any medium of communication in the United States offering passage or soliciting passengers for ocean voyages anywhere in the world shall include information similar to the information described in subsection (a) of this section, and shall specify the registry of each vessel named, as a part of the advertisement or description of the voyage. Except for the inclusion of the country of registry of the vessel, this subsection does not apply to voyages by vessels meeting the safety standards described in section 3505 of this title.

(c) A person violating this section or a regulation prescribed under this section is liable to the United States Government for a civil penalty of not more than $10,000. If the violation involves the sale of tickets for passage, the owner, charterer, managing operator, agent, master, individual in charge, or any other person involved in each violation also is liable to the Government for a civil penalty of $500 for each ticket sold. The vessel on which passage is sold also is liable in rem for a violation of this section or a regulation prescribed under this section.

(Pub. L. 98–89, Aug. 26, 1983, 97 Stat. 519.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised sectionSource section (U.S. Code)
3504 46:362(b)

Section 3504 requires notification to the public of the safety standards that are applicable to certain foreign flag or United States passenger vessels. In addition, all promotional literature or advertising that offers passage or solicits passengers for ocean voyages anywhere in the world shall include a safety standard statement and shall specify the registry of the vessel. If the vessel meets the international standards to which the United States adheres, then the safety standard statement need not be included. In all other cases the type of safety standard statement that must be included is as prescribed by regulation. This section is intended to place the United States public on notice as to the degree of fire safety compliance of a foreign-flag passenger vessel that does not operate or depart from a port or place in the United States but does embark passengers from the United States at nearby foreign ports. Departures from foreign ports are undertaken because the foreign-flag passenger vessel cannot comply with the safety standards applicable to a United States flag passenger vessel.

§3505. Prevention of departure

Notwithstanding section 3303 of this title, a foreign vessel carrying a citizen of the United States as a passenger or embarking passengers from a United States port may not depart from a United States port if the Secretary finds that the vessel does not comply with the standards stated in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea to which the United States Government is currently a party.

(Pub. L. 98–89, Aug. 26, 1983, 97 Stat. 520; Pub. L. 102–587, title V, §5210(b), Nov. 4, 1992, 106 Stat. 5076; Pub. L. 108–293, title IV, §411(a), Aug. 9, 2004, 118 Stat. 1045.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised sectionSource section (U.S. Code)
3505 46:362(c)

Section 3505 prohibits the departure from a United States port or place of any passenger vessel of more than 100 gross tons having berthing for at least 50 passengers, if the vessel does not comply with the international maritime safety standards applicable to United States vessels.

Amendments

2004Pub. L. 108–293 reenacted section catchline without change and amended text generally. Prior to amendment, text read as follows: "Notwithstanding section 3303(a) of this title, a foreign vessel may not depart from a United States port with passengers who are embarked at that port, if the Secretary finds that the vessel does not comply with the standards stated in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea to which the United States Government is currently a party."

1992Pub. L. 102–587 substituted "foreign vessel may not depart" for "foreign or domestic vessel of more than 100 gross tons having berth or stateroom accommodations for at least 50 passengers may not depart".

International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea

For International Conventions for the Safety of Life at Sea to which the United States has been a party, see section 1602 of Title 33, Navigation and Navigable Waters, and notes thereunder.

§3506. Copies of laws

A master of a passenger vessel shall keep on board a copy of this subtitle, to be provided by the Secretary at reasonable cost. If the master fails to do so, the master is liable to the United States Government for a civil penalty of $200.

(Pub. L. 98–89, Aug. 26, 1983, 97 Stat. 520.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised sectionSource section (U.S. Code)
3506 46:492

Section 3506 requires the master of a passenger vessel to keep on board a copy of subtitle II of title 46, U.S.C. Copies of the subtitle shall be provided by the Secretary at reasonable cost.

§3507. Passenger vessel security and safety requirements

(a) Vessel Design, Equipment, Construction, and Retrofitting Requirements.—

(1) In general.—Each vessel to which this subsection applies shall comply with the following design and construction standards:

(A) The vessel shall be equipped with ship rails that are located not less than 42 inches above the cabin deck.

(B) Each passenger stateroom and crew cabin shall be equipped with entry doors that include peep holes or other means of visual identification.

(C) For any vessel the keel of which is laid after the date of enactment of the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act of 2010, each passenger stateroom and crew cabin shall be equipped with—

(i) security latches; and

(ii) time-sensitive key technology.


(D) The vessel shall integrate technology that can be used for capturing images of passengers or detecting passengers who have fallen overboard, to the extent that such technology is available.

(E) The vessel shall be equipped with a sufficient number of operable acoustic hailing or other such warning devices to provide communication capability around the entire vessel when operating in high risk areas (as defined by the United States Coast Guard).


(2) Fire safety codes.—In administering the requirements of paragraph (1)(C), the Secretary shall take into consideration fire safety and other applicable emergency requirements established by the U.S. Coast Guard and under international law, as appropriate.


(b) Video Recording.—

(1) Requirement to maintain surveillance.—The owner of a vessel to which this section applies shall maintain a video surveillance system to assist in documenting crimes on the vessel and in providing evidence for the prosecution of such crimes, as determined by the Secretary.

(2) Access to video records.—The owner of a vessel to which this section applies shall provide to any law enforcement official performing official duties in the course and scope of an investigation, upon request, a copy of all records of video surveillance that the official believes may provide evidence of a crime reported to law enforcement officials.


(c) Safety Information.—

(1) Criminal Activity Prevention and Response Guide.—The owner of a vessel to which this section applies (or the owner's designee) shall—

(A) have available for each passenger a guide (referred to in this subsection as the "security guide"), written in commonly understood English, which—

(i) provides a description of medical and security personnel designated on board to prevent and respond to criminal and medical situations with 24 hour contact instructions;

(ii) describes the jurisdictional authority applicable, and the law enforcement processes available, with respect to the reporting of homicide, suspicious death, a missing United States national, kidnapping, assault with serious bodily injury, any offense to which section 2241, 2242, 2243, or 2244(a) or (c) of title 18 applies, firing or tampering with the vessel, or theft of money or property in excess of $10,000, together with contact information for the appropriate law enforcement authorities for missing persons or reportable crimes which arise—

(I) in the territorial waters of the United States;

(II) on the high seas; or

(III) in any country to be visited on the voyage;


(B) provide a copy of the security guide to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for comment; and

(C) publicize the security guide on the website of the vessel owner.


(2) Embassy and consulate locations.—The owner of a vessel to which this section applies shall provide in each passenger stateroom, and post in a location readily accessible to all crew and in other places specified by the Secretary, information regarding the locations of the United States embassy and each consulate of the United States for each country the vessel will visit during the course of the voyage.


(d) Sexual Assault.—The owner of a vessel to which this section applies shall—

(1) maintain on the vessel adequate, in-date supplies of anti-retroviral medications and other medications designed to prevent sexually transmitted diseases after a sexual assault;

(2) maintain on the vessel equipment and materials for performing a medical examination in sexual assault cases to evaluate the patient for trauma, provide medical care, and preserve relevant medical evidence;

(3) make available on the vessel at all times medical staff who have undergone a credentialing process to verify that he or she—

(A) possesses a current physician's or registered nurse's license and—

(i) has at least 3 years of post-graduate or post-registration clinical practice in general and emergency medicine; or

(ii) holds board certification in emergency medicine, family practice medicine, or internal medicine;


(B) is able to provide assistance in the event of an alleged sexual assault, has received training in conducting forensic sexual assault examination, and is able to promptly perform such an examination upon request and provide proper medical treatment of a victim, including administration of anti-retroviral medications and other medications that may prevent the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and other sexually transmitted diseases; and

(C) meets guidelines established by the American College of Emergency Physicians relating to the treatment and care of victims of sexual assault;


(4) prepare, provide to the patient, and maintain written documentation of the findings of such examination that is signed by the patient; and

(5) provide the patient free and immediate access to—

(A) contact information for local law enforcement, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the United States Coast Guard, the nearest United States consulate or embassy, and the National Sexual Assault Hotline program or other third party victim advocacy hotline service; and

(B) a private telephone line and Internet-accessible computer terminal by which the individual may confidentially access law enforcement officials, an attorney, and the information and support services available through the National Sexual Assault Hotline program or other third party victim advocacy hotline service.


(e) Confidentiality of Sexual Assault Examination and Support Information.—The master or other individual in charge of a vessel to which this section applies shall—

(1) treat all information concerning an examination under subsection (d) confidential, so that no medical information may be released to the cruise line or other owner of the vessel or any legal representative thereof without the prior knowledge and approval in writing of the patient, or, if the patient is unable to provide written authorization, the patient's next-of-kin, except that nothing in this paragraph prohibits the release of—

(A) information, other than medical findings, necessary for the owner or master of the vessel to comply with the provisions of subsection (g) or other applicable incident reporting laws;

(B) information to secure the safety of passengers or crew on board the vessel; or

(C) any information to law enforcement officials performing official duties in the course and scope of an investigation; and


(2) treat any information derived from, or obtained in connection with, post-assault counseling or other supportive services as confidential, so no such information may be released to the cruise line or any legal representative thereof without the prior knowledge and approval in writing of the patient, or, if the patient is unable to provide written authorization, the patient's next-of-kin.


(f) Crew Access to Passenger Staterooms.—The owner of a vessel to which this section applies shall—

(1) establish and implement procedures and restrictions concerning—

(A) which crewmembers have access to passenger staterooms; and

(B) the periods during which they have that access; and


(2) ensure that the procedures and restrictions are fully and properly implemented and periodically reviewed.


(g) Log Book and Reporting Requirements.—

(1) In general.—The owner of a vessel to which this section applies shall—

(A) record in a log book, either electronically or otherwise, in a centralized location readily accessible to law enforcement personnel, a report on—

(i) all complaints of crimes described in paragraph (3)(A)(i),

(ii) all complaints of theft of property valued in excess of $1,000, and

(iii) all complaints of other crimes,


committed on any voyage that embarks or disembarks passengers in the United States; and

(B) make such log book available upon request to any agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, any member of the United States Coast Guard, and any law enforcement officer performing official duties in the course and scope of an investigation.


(2) Details required.—The information recorded under paragraph (1) shall include, at a minimum—

(A) the vessel operator;

(B) the name of the cruise line;

(C) the flag under which the vessel was operating at the time the reported incident occurred;

(D) the age and gender of the victim and the accused assailant;

(E) the nature of the alleged crime or complaint, as applicable, including whether the alleged perpetrator was a passenger or a crewmember;

(F) the vessel's position at the time of the incident, if known, or the position of the vessel at the time of the initial report;

(G) the time, date, and method of the initial report and the law enforcement authority to which the initial report was made;

(H) the time and date the incident occurred, if known;

(I) the total number of passengers and the total number of crew members on the voyage; and

(J) the case number or other identifier provided by the law enforcement authority to which the initial report was made.


(3) Requirement to report crimes and other information.—

(A) In general.—The owner of a vessel to which this section applies (or the owner's designee)—

(i) shall contact the nearest Federal Bureau of Investigation Field Office or Legal Attache by telephone as soon as possible after the occurrence on board the vessel of an incident involving homicide, suspicious death, a missing United States national, kidnapping, assault with serious bodily injury, any offense to which section 2241, 2242, 2243, or 2244(a) or (c) of title 18 applies, firing or tampering with the vessel, or theft of money or property in excess of $10,000 to report the incident;

(ii) shall furnish a written report of each incident specified in clause (i) to the Internet website maintained by the Secretary of Transportation under paragraph (4)(A);

(iii) may report any serious incident that does not meet the reporting requirements of clause (i) and that does not require immediate attention by the Federal Bureau of Investigation via the Internet website maintained by the Secretary of Transportation under paragraph (4)(A); and

(iv) may report any other criminal incident involving passengers or crewmembers, or both, to the proper State or local government law enforcement authority.


(B) Incidents to which subparagraph (A) applies.—Subparagraph (A) applies to an incident involving criminal activity if—

(i) the vessel, regardless of registry, is owned, in whole or in part, by a United States person, regardless of the nationality of the victim or perpetrator, and the incident occurs when the vessel is within the admiralty and maritime jurisdiction of the United States and outside the jurisdiction of any State;

(ii) the incident concerns an offense by or against a United States national committed outside the jurisdiction of any nation;

(iii) the incident occurs in the Territorial Sea of the United States, regardless of the nationality of the vessel, the victim, or the perpetrator; or

(iv) the incident concerns a victim or perpetrator who is a United States national on a vessel during a voyage that departed from or will arrive at a United States port.


(4) Availability of incident data via internet.—

(A) Website.—

(i) In general.—The Secretary of Transportation shall maintain a statistical compilation of all incidents on board a cruise vessel specified in paragraph (3)(A)(i) on an Internet website that provides a numerical accounting of the missing persons and alleged crimes reported under that paragraph without regard to the investigative status of the incident.

(ii) Updates and other requirements.—The compilation under clause (i) shall—

(I) be updated not less frequently than quarterly;

(II) be able to be sorted by cruise line;

(III) identify each cruise line by name;

(IV) identify each crime or alleged crime committed or allegedly committed by a passenger or crewmember;

(V) identify the number of individuals alleged overboard; and

(VI) include the approximate number of passengers and crew carried by each cruise line during each quarterly reporting period.


(iii) User-friendly format.—The Secretary of Transportation shall ensure that the compilation, data, and any other information provided on the Internet website maintained under this subparagraph are in a user-friendly format. The Secretary shall, to the greatest extent practicable, use existing commercial off the shelf technology to transfer and establish the website, and shall not independently develop software, or acquire new hardware in operating the site.


(B) Access to website.—Each cruise line taking on or discharging passengers in the United States shall include a link on its Internet website to the website maintained by the Secretary of Transportation under subparagraph (A).


(h) Enforcement.—

(1) Penalties.—

(A) Civil penalty.—Any person that violates this section or a regulation under this section shall be liable for a civil penalty of not more than $25,000 for each day during which the violation continues, except that the maximum penalty for a continuing violation is $50,000.

(B) Criminal penalty.—Any person that willfully violates this section or a regulation under this section shall be fined not more than $250,000 or imprisoned not more than 1 year, or both.


(2) Denial of entry.—The Secretary may deny entry into the United States to a vessel to which this section applies if the owner of the vessel—

(A) commits an act or omission for which a penalty may be imposed under this subsection; or

(B) fails to pay a penalty imposed on the owner under this subsection.


(i) Procedures.—The Secretary shall maintain guidelines, training curricula, and inspection and certification procedures necessary to carry out the requirements of this section.

(j) Regulations.—The Secretary and the Commandant shall each issue such regulations as are necessary to implement this section.

(k) Application.—

(1) In general.—This section and section 3508 apply to a passenger vessel (as defined in section 2101(31)) that—

(A) is authorized to carry at least 250 passengers;

(B) has onboard sleeping facilities for each passenger;

(C) is on a voyage that embarks or disembarks passengers in the United States; and

(D) is not engaged on a coastwise voyage.


(2) Federal and state vessels.—This section and section 3508 do not apply to a vessel of the United States operated by the Federal Government or a vessel owned and operated by a State.


(l) Definition.—In this section and section 3508, the term "owner" means the owner, charterer, managing operator, master, or other individual in charge of a vessel.

(Added Pub. L. 111–207, §3(a), July 27, 2010, 124 Stat. 2244; amended Pub. L. 113–281, title III, §321, Dec. 18, 2014, 128 Stat. 3054; Pub. L. 115–232, div. C, title XXXV, §§3541(b)(9), 3543(a), Aug. 13, 2018, 132 Stat. 2323, 2324.)

References in Text

The date of enactment of the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act of 2010, referred to in subsec. (a)(1)(C), is the date of enactment of Pub. L. 111–207, which was approved July 27, 2010.

Amendments

2018—Subsec. (a)(3). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(a)(1), struck out par. (3) which related to effective date of par. (1) requirements.

Subsec. (e)(2). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(a)(2), substituted "services as confidential" for "services confidential".

Subsec. (i). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(a)(3), substituted "The Secretary shall maintain" for "Within 6 months after the date of enactment of the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act of 2010, the Secretary shall issue".

Subsec. (k)(1). Pub. L. 115–232, §3541(b)(9)(A), substituted "section 2101(31)" for "section 2101(22)" in introductory provisions.

Subsec. (l). Pub. L. 115–232, §3541(b)(9)(B), added subsec. (l) and struck out former subsec. (l) which defined "Commandant" and "owner".

2014—Subsec. (g)(3)(A)(ii). Pub. L. 113–281, §321(a)(1), substituted "each incident specified in clause (i) to the Internet website maintained by the Secretary of Transportation under paragraph (4)(A)" for "the incident to an Internet based portal maintained by the Secretary".

Subsec. (g)(3)(A)(iii). Pub. L. 113–281, §321(a)(2), substituted "Internet website maintained by the Secretary of Transportation under paragraph (4)(A)" for "Internet based portal maintained by the Secretary".

Subsec. (g)(4)(A). Pub. L. 113–281, §321(b)(1), added subpar. (A) and struck out former subpar. (A). Prior to amendment, text read as follows: "The Secretary shall maintain a statistical compilation of all incidents described in paragraph (3)(A)(i) on an Internet site that provides a numerical accounting of the missing persons and alleged crimes recorded in each report filed under paragraph (3)(A)(i) that are no longer under investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The data shall be updated no less frequently than quarterly, aggregated by cruise line, each cruise line shall be identified by name, and each crime shall be identified as to whether it was committed by a passenger or a crew member."

Subsec. (g)(4)(B). Pub. L. 113–281, §321(b)(2), substituted "Secretary of Transportation" for "Secretary".

Findings

Pub. L. 111–207, §2, July 27, 2010, 124 Stat. 2243, provided that: "The Congress makes the following findings:

"(1) There are approximately 200 overnight ocean-going cruise vessels worldwide. The average ocean-going cruise vessel carries 2,000 passengers with a crew of 950 people.

"(2) In 2007 alone, approximately 12,000,000 passengers were projected to take a cruise worldwide.

"(3) Passengers on cruise vessels have an inadequate appreciation of their potential vulnerability to crime while on ocean voyages, and those who may be victimized lack the information they need to understand their legal rights or to know whom to contact for help in the immediate aftermath of the crime.

"(4) Sexual violence, the disappearance of passengers from vessels on the high seas, and other serious crimes have occurred during luxury cruises.

"(5) Over the last 5 years, sexual assault and physical assaults on cruise vessels were the leading crimes investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation with regard to cruise vessel incidents.

"(6) These crimes at sea can involve attacks both by passengers and crewmembers on other passengers and crewmembers.

"(7) Except for United States flagged vessels, or foreign flagged vessels operating in an area subject to the direct jurisdiction of the United States, there are no Federal statutes or regulations that explicitly require cruise lines to report alleged crimes to United States Government officials.

"(8) It is not known precisely how often crimes occur on cruise vessels or exactly how many people have disappeared during ocean voyages because cruise line companies do not make comprehensive, crime-related data readily available to the public.

"(9) Obtaining reliable crime-related cruise data from governmental sources can be difficult, because multiple countries may be involved when a crime occurs on the high seas, including the flag country for the vessel, the country of citizenship of particular passengers, and any countries having special or maritime jurisdiction.

"(10) It can be difficult for professional crime investigators to immediately secure an alleged crime scene on a cruise vessel, recover evidence of an onboard offense, and identify or interview potential witnesses to the alleged crime.

"(11) Most cruise vessels that operate into and out of United States ports are registered under the laws of another country, and investigations and prosecutions of crimes against passengers and crewmembers may involve the laws and authorities of multiple nations.

"(12) The Department of Homeland Security has found it necessary to establish 500-yard security zones around cruise vessels to limit the risk of terrorist attack. Recently piracy has dramatically increased throughout the world.

"(13) To enhance the safety of cruise passengers, the owners of cruise vessels could upgrade, modernize, and retrofit the safety and security infrastructure on such vessels by installing peep holes in passenger room doors, installing security video cameras in targeted areas, limiting access to passenger rooms to select staff during specific times, and installing acoustic hailing and warning devices capable of communicating over distances."

§3508. Crime scene preservation training for passenger vessel crewmembers

(a) In General.—The Secretary, in consultation with the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Maritime Administration, shall maintain training standards and curricula to allow for the certification of passenger vessel security personnel, crewmembers, and law enforcement officials on the appropriate methods for prevention, detection, evidence preservation, and reporting of criminal activities in the international maritime environment. The Administrator of the Maritime Administration may certify organizations in the United States and abroad that offer the curriculum for training and certification under subsection (c).

(b) Minimum Standards.—The standards established by the Secretary under subsection (a) shall include—

(1) the training and certification of vessel security personnel, crewmembers, and law enforcement officials in accordance with accepted law enforcement and security guidelines, policies, and procedures, including recommendations for incorporating a background check process for personnel trained and certified in foreign ports;

(2) the training of students and instructors in all aspects of prevention, detection, evidence preservation, and reporting of criminal activities in the international maritime environment; and

(3) the provision or recognition of off-site training and certification courses in the United States and foreign countries to develop and provide the required training and certification described in subsection (a) and to enhance security awareness and security practices related to the preservation of evidence in response to crimes on board passenger vessels.


(c) Certification Requirement.—No vessel to which this section applies may enter a United States port on a voyage (or voyage segment) on which a United States citizen is a passenger unless there is at least 1 crewmember onboard who is certified as having successfully completed training in the prevention, detection, evidence preservation, and reporting of criminal activities in the international maritime environment on passenger vessels under subsection (a).

(d) Civil Penalty.—Any person that violates this section or a regulation under this section shall be liable for a civil penalty of not more than $50,000.

(e) Denial of Entry.—The Secretary may deny entry into the United States to a vessel to which this section applies if the owner of the vessel—

(1) commits an act or omission for which a penalty may be imposed under subsection (d); or

(2) fails to pay a penalty imposed on the owner under subsection (d).

(Added Pub. L. 111–207, §3(a), July 27, 2010, 124 Stat. 2250; amended Pub. L. 115–232, div. C, title XXXV, §3543(b), Aug. 13, 2018, 132 Stat. 2324.)

Amendments

2018—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(b)(1), substituted "The Secretary" for "Within 1 year after the date of enactment of the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act of 2010, the Secretary" and "maintain" for "develop".

Subsec. (c). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(b)(2), substituted "No" for "Beginning 2 years after the standards are established under subsection (b), no".

Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(b)(3), redesignated subsec. (e) as (d) and struck out former subsec. (d) which related to interim training requirement.

Subsec. (e). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(b)(3), redesignated subsec. (f) as (e). Former subsec. (e) redesignated (d).

Subsec. (e)(1), (2). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(b)(4), substituted "subsection (d)" for "subsection (e)".

Subsec. (f). Pub. L. 115–232, §3543(b)(3), redesignated subsec. (f) as (e).