[USC02] 22 USC CHAPTER 32, SUBCHAPTER I, Part II, subpart i: multilateral and regional development programs
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22 USC CHAPTER 32, SUBCHAPTER I, Part II, subpart i: multilateral and regional development programs
From Title 22—FOREIGN RELATIONS AND INTERCOURSECHAPTER 32—FOREIGN ASSISTANCESUBCHAPTER I—INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTPart II—Other Programs

subpart i—multilateral and regional development programs

§§2161, 2162. Repealed. Pub. L. 95–424, title I, §102(g)(1)(A), Oct. 6, 1978, 92 Stat. 942

Section 2161, Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §201, Sept. 4, 1961, 75 Stat. 426; Pub. L. 87–565, pt. I, §102, Aug. 1, 1962, 76 Stat. 256; Pub. L. 88–205, pt. I, §102(a), Dec. 16, 1963, 77 Stat. 380; Pub. L. 88–633, pt. I, §101, Oct. 7, 1964, 78 Stat. 1009; Pub. L. 89–583, pt. I, §102(a), Sept. 19, 1966, 80 Stat. 796; Pub. L. 90–137, pt. I, §102(a), (b), Nov. 14, 1967, 81 Stat. 447; Pub. L. 90–554, pt. I, §101(a), Oct. 8, 1968, 82 Stat. 960, related to the establishment by the President of the Development Loan Fund. See section 2151(b) of this title.

Section 2162, Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §202, Sept. 4, 1961, 75 Stat. 426; Pub. L. 88–205, pt. I, §102(b), Dec. 16, 1963, 77 Stat. 380; Pub. L. 89–583, pt. I, §102(b), Sept. 19, 1966, 80 Stat. 796; Pub. L. 90–137, pt. I, §102(c), Nov. 14, 1967, 81 Stat. 447; Pub. L. 90–554, pt. I, §101(b), Oct. 8, 1968, 82 Stat. 960; Pub. L. 91–175, pt. I, §101(a), Dec. 30, 1969, 83 Stat. 805; Pub. L. 92–226, pt. I, §101(a), Feb. 7, 1972, 86 Stat. 21, related to authorization of appropriations, availability of funds, and encouragement of development through private enterprise.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective Oct. 1, 1978, see section 605 of Pub. L. 95–424, set out as an Effective Date of 1978 Amendment note under section 2151 of this title.

§2163. Repealed. Pub. L. 93–189, §3(b), Dec. 17, 1973, 87 Stat. 717

Section, Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §203, Sept. 4, 1961, 75 Stat. 427; Pub. L. 91–175, pt. I, §101(b), Dec. 30, 1969, 83 Stat. 805; Pub. L. 92–226, pt. I, §101(b), Feb. 7, 1972, 86 Stat. 21; Pub. L. 93–189, §3(a), Dec. 17, 1973, 87 Stat. 717; Pub. L. 93–559, §6, Dec. 30, 1974, 88 Stat. 1796, authorized use of not more than 50 per centum of dollar receipts scheduled to be paid during each of the fiscal years 1974 and 1975 from loans made under this subchapter and predecessor foreign assistance legislation for making loans under part I of this subchapter for each such fiscal year, and disposition of dollar receipts paid on and after July 1, 1975.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective July 1, 1975, see section 3(b) of Pub. L. 93–189.

§2164. Repealed. Pub. L. 95–424, title I, §102(g)(1)(A), Oct. 6, 1978, 92 Stat. 942

Section, Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §204, Sept. 4, 1961, 75 Stat. 427, related to the establishment, duties and appointment of officers of the Development Loan Committee. The provisions of this section were redesignated as subsec. (e) of section 2151t of this title by section 102(d)(1), (2) of Pub. L. 95–424.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective Oct. 1, 1978, see section 605 of Pub. L. 95–424, set out as an Effective Date of 1978 Amendment note under section 2151 of this title.

§2165. Repealed. Pub. L. 92–226, pt. I, §101(d), Feb. 7, 1972, 86 Stat. 21

Section, Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §205, Sept. 4, 1961, 75 Stat. 427; Pub. L. 89–171, pt. I, §102(a), Sept. 6, 1965, 79 Stat. 653; Pub. L. 89–583, pt. I, §102(c), Sept. 19, 1966, 80 Stat. 797; Pub. L. 90–137, pt. I, §102(d), Nov. 14, 1967, 81 Stat. 447, provided for use of international lending organizations.

§2166. Regional development in Africa

The President is requested to seek and to take appropriate action, in cooperation and consultation with African and other interested nations and with international development organizations, to further and assist in the advancement of African regional development institutions, including the African Development Bank, with the view toward promoting African economic development.

(Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §206, as added Pub. L. 89–171, pt. I, §102(b), Sept. 6, 1965, 79 Stat. 653.)

Delegation of Functions

For delegation of functions of President under this section, see Ex. Ord. No. 12163, Sept. 29, 1979, 44 F.R. 56673, as amended, set out as a note under section 2381 of this title.

African Assistance Policy; Presidential Report to Congress

Pub. L. 93–559, §49, Dec. 30, 1974, 88 Stat. 1816, which related to Presidential review and report on African assistance policy, was repealed by Pub. L. 97–113, title VII, §734(a)(8), Dec. 29, 1981, 95 Stat. 1560.

Portuguese African Territories of Angola, Mozambique, and Guinea-Bissau: Independence Policy

Pub. L. 93–559, §50, Dec. 30, 1974, 88 Stat. 1816, as amended by Pub. L. 97–113, title VII, §734(a)(8), Dec. 29, 1981, 95 Stat. 1560, provided that:

"(a)(1) Congress finds that the Government of Portugal's recognition of the right to independence of the African territories of Angola, Mozambique, and Guinea-Bissau marks a significant advance toward the goal of self-determination for all the peoples of Africa, without which peace on the continent is not secure.

"(2) Congress finds that progress toward independence for the Portuguese African territories will have a significant impact on the international organizations and the community of nations.

"(3) Congress commends the Portuguese Government's initiatives on these fronts as evidence of a reaffirmation of that Government's support for her obligations under both the United Nations Charter and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

"(b) Therefore, Congress calls upon the President and the Secretary of State to take the following actions designed to make clear United States support for a peaceful and orderly transition to independence in the Portuguese African territories:

"(1) An official statement should be issued of United States support for the independence of Angola, Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau, and of our desire to have good relations with the future governments of the countries.

"(2) It should be made clear to the Government of of Portugal that we view the efforts toward a peaceful and just settlement of the conflict in the African territories as consistent with Portugal's obligations under the North Atlantic Treaty Organization partnership.

"(3) The United States should encourage United Nations support for a peaceful transition to independence, negotiated settlement of all differences, and the protection of human rights of all citizens of the three territories.

"(4) The United States should open a dialog with potential leaders of Angola, Mozambique, and Guinea-Bissau and assure them of our commitment to their genuine political and economic independence.

"(5) The economic development needs of the three territories will be immense when independence is achieved. Therefore, it is urged that the United States Agency for International Development devote attention to assessing the economic situation in Angola, Mozambique, and Guinea-Bissau and be ready to cooperate with the future governments in providing the kind of assistance that will help make their independence viable. In addition, the United States Government should take the initiative among other donors, both bilateral and multilateral, in seeking significant contribution of development assistance for the three territories.

"(6) In light of the need of Angola, Mozambique, and Guinea-Bissau for skilled and educated manpower, a priority consideration should be given to expanding current United States programs of educational assistance to the territories as a timely and substantive contribution to their independence.

"(c) [Repealed. Pub. L. 97–113, title VII, §734(a)(8), Dec. 29, 1981, 95 Stat. 1560.]"

Executive Order No. 12599

Ex. Ord. No. 12599, June 23, 1987, 52 F.R. 23779, which established the Coordinating Committee for Sub-Saharan Africa and assigned its functions in order to establish procedures for development of a common long-term goal for all United States economic programs and policies in Sub-Saharan Africa, was revoked by Ex. Ord. No. 13118, §10(3), Mar. 31, 1999, 64 F.R. 16598.

§§2167, 2168. Repealed. Pub. L. 95–424, title I, §102(g)(1)(A), Oct. 6, 1978, 92 Stat. 942

Section 2167, Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §207, as added Pub. L. 90–137, pt. I, §102(e), Nov. 14, 1967, 81 Stat. 448, related to placement of emphasis on democratic institutions, agriculture, education, public health and other needs, in the furnishing of development assistance.

Section 2168, Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §208, as added Pub. L. 90–137, pt. I, §102(e), Nov. 14, 1967, 81 Stat. 448, related to the taking into account, in determining to what extent United States should furnish assistance, of country's own efforts to aid itself.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective Oct. 1, 1978, see section 605 of Pub. L. 95–424, set out as an Effective Date of 1978 Amendment note under section 2151 of this title.

§2169. Multilateral, regional, and bilateral programs

(a) Multilateral programs

The Congress recognizes that the planning and administration of development assistance by, or under the sponsorship of the United Nations, multilateral lending institutions, and other multilateral organizations may contribute to the efficiency and effectiveness of that assistance through participation of other donors in the development effort, improved coordination of policies and programs, pooling of knowledge, avoidance of duplication of facilities and manpower, and greater encouragement of self-help performance.

(b) Regional programs

It is further the sense of the Congress (1) that where problems or opportunities are common to two or more countries in a region, in such fields as agriculture, education, transportation, communications, power, watershed development, disease control, and establishment of development banks, these countries often can more effectively resolve such problems and exploit such opportunities by joining together in regional organizations or working together on regional programs, (2) that assistance often can be utilized more efficiently in regional programs than in separate country programs, and (3) that to the maximum extent practicable consistent with the purposes of this chapter assistance under this chapter should be furnished so as to encourage less developed countries to cooperate with each other in regional development programs.

(c) Federal funds to multilateral lending institutions and multilateral organizations for loans to foreign countries; increase

It is the sense of the Congress that the President should increase, to the extent practicable, the funds provided by the United States to multilateral lending institutions and multilateral organizations in which the United States participates for use by such institutions and organizations in making loans to foreign countries.

(Pub. L. 87–195, pt. I, §209, as added Pub. L. 90–137, pt. I, §102(e), Nov. 14, 1967, 81 Stat. 449; amended Pub. L. 92–226, pt. I, §101(c), Feb. 7, 1972, 86 Stat. 21; Pub. L. 94–161, title III, §311(1), Dec. 20, 1975, 89 Stat. 860; Pub. L. 106–429, §101(a) [title VIII, §804], Nov. 6, 2000, 114 Stat. 1900, 1900A-67.)

References in Text

This chapter, referred to in subsec. (b), was in the original "this Act", meaning Pub. L. 87–195, Sept. 4, 1961, 75 Stat. 424, as amended, known as the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 2151 of this title and Tables.

Amendments

2000—Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 106–429 struck out subsec. (d) which read as follows: "In furtherance of the provisions of subsection (a) of this section, any funds appropriated under subchapter I of this chapter may be transferred by the President to the International Development Association, the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the International Finance Corporation, the Asian Development Bank or other multilateral lending institutions and multilateral organizations in which the United States participates for the purpose of providing funds to enable any such institution or organization to make loans to foreign countries."

1975—Subsec. (c). Pub. L. 94–161 substituted provision for increase of Federal funds to multilateral lending institutions and multilateral organizations for making loans to foreign countries for prior provision for reduction of loans under the bilateral lending programs to attain a total amount not to exceed $100,000,000 not later than June 30, 1975.

1972—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 92–226, §101(c)(1), in amending subsec. (a) generally, provided for United Nations sponsorship of development assistance and substituted "may contribute" for "may, in some instances, contribute".

Subsecs. (c), (d). Pub. L. 92–226, §101(c)(2), added subsecs. (c) and (d).

Delegation of Functions

For delegation of functions of President under this section, see Ex. Ord. No. 12163, Sept. 29, 1979, 44 F.R. 56673, as amended, set out as a note under section 2381 of this title.

Establishment of Standard Governing Allocation of Development Assistance for Production and Export of Commodities in Surplus in World Market; Presidential Initiation of International Consultations; Report by President to Congress

Pub. L. 95–481, title VI, §610, Oct. 18, 1978, 92 Stat. 1602, provided that: "The President shall initiate wide international consultations beginning with the member nations of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), designed to develop a viable standard governing the allocation of development assistance for the production and export of commodities. Such consultations shall relate to commodities which are in surplus in the world market and if produced for export would cause substantial harm to producers of the same, similar or competing products. Not later than one year after the enactment of this Act [Oct. 18, 1978] the President shall report to the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and the Chairmen of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees on the progress made in carrying out this section."

Policy With Respect to Countries Most Seriously Affected by Food Shortages; Presidential Reports to Congress

Pub. L. 93–559, §55(a), Dec. 30, 1974, 88 Stat. 1819, provided that: "The United Nations has designated thirty-two countries as 'Most Seriously Affected' by the current economic crisis. These are countries without the internal food production capability or the foreign exchange availability to secure food to meet their immediate food requirements. The Congress calls upon the President and Secretary of State to take the following actions designed to mobilize appropriate resources to meet the food emergency:

"(1) Review and make appropriate adjustments in the level of programming of our food and fertilizer assistance programs with the aim of increasing to the maximum extent feasible the volume of food and fertilizer available to those countries most seriously affected by current food shortages.

"(2) Call upon all traditional and potential new donors of food, fertilizer, or the means of financing these commodities to immediately increase their participation in efforts to address the emergency food needs of the developing world.

"(3) Make available to these most seriously affected countries the maximum feasible volume of food commodities, with appropriate regard to the current domestic price and supply situations.

"(4) Maintain regular and full consultation with the appropriate committees of the Congress and report to the Congress and the Nation on steps which are being taken to help meet this food emergency. In accordance with this provision, the President shall report to the Congress on a global assessment of food needs for fiscal year 1975, specifying expected food grain deficits and currently planned programming of food assistance, and steps which are being taken to encourage other countries to increase their participation in food assistance or the financing of food assistance. Such report should reach the Congress promptly and should be supplemented quarterly for the remainder of fiscal year 1975.

"(5) The Congress directs that during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1975, not more than 30 percent of concessional food aid should be allocated to countries other than those which are most seriously affected by current food shortages, unless the President demonstrates to the appropriate Committees of the Congress that the use of such food assistance is solely for humanitarian food purposes.

"(6) The Congress calls upon the President to proceed with the implementation of resolutions and recommendations adopted by the World Food Conference. The Congress believes that it is incumbent upon the United States to take a leading role in assisting in the development of a viable and coherent world food policy which would begin the task of alleviating widespread hunger and suffering prevalent in famine-stricken nations. The President shall report to the Congress within 120 days of enactment of this Act [Dec. 30, 1974] on the implementation of the resolutions and the extent to which the United States is participating in the implementation of resolutions adopted at the World Food Conference."