[USC02] 22 USC CHAPTER 89, SUBCHAPTER III: ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON DEMOCRACY PROMOTION AND THE INTERNET WEBSITE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE
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22 USC CHAPTER 89, SUBCHAPTER III: ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON DEMOCRACY PROMOTION AND THE INTERNET WEBSITE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE
From Title 22—FOREIGN RELATIONS AND INTERCOURSECHAPTER 89—ADVANCING DEMOCRATIC VALUES

SUBCHAPTER III—ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON DEMOCRACY PROMOTION AND THE INTERNET WEBSITE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

§8231. Advisory Committee on Democracy Promotion

Congress commends the Secretary for creating an Advisory Committee on Democracy Promotion, and it is the sense of Congress that the Committee should play a significant role in the Department's transformational diplomacy by advising the Secretary regarding United States efforts to promote democracy and democratic transition in connection with the formulation and implementation of United States foreign policy and foreign assistance, including reviewing and making recommendations on—

(1) how to improve the capacity of the Department to promote democracy and human rights; and

(2) how to improve foreign assistance programs related to the promotion of democracy.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XXI, §2131, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 533.)

§8232. Sense of Congress regarding the Internet website of the Department of State

It is the sense of Congress that in order to facilitate access by individuals, nongovernmental organizations, and movements in foreign countries to documents, streaming video and audio, and other media regarding democratic principles, practices, and values, and the promotion and strengthening of democracy, the Secretary should take additional steps to enhance the Internet site for global democracy and human rights of the Department, which should include, where practicable, the following:

(1) Narratives and histories, published by the United States Government, of significant democratic movements in foreign countries, particularly regarding successful nonviolent campaigns to promote democracy in non-democratic countries and democratic transition countries.

(2) Narratives, published by the United States Government, relating to the importance of the establishment of and respect for internationally recognized human rights, democratic principles, practices, and values, and other fundamental freedoms.

(3) Major human rights reports by the United States Government, including translations of such materials, as appropriate.

(4) Any other documents, references, or links to appropriate external Internet websites (such as websites of international or nongovernmental organizations), including references or links to training materials, narratives, and histories regarding successful democratic movements.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XXI, §2132, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 533.)