[USC02] 34 USC Subtitle I, CHAPTER 101, SUBCHAPTER XXIV: MATCHING GRANT PROGRAM FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ARMOR VESTS
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34 USC Subtitle I, CHAPTER 101, SUBCHAPTER XXIV: MATCHING GRANT PROGRAM FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ARMOR VESTS
From Title 34—CRIME CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENTSubtitle I—Comprehensive ActsCHAPTER 101—JUSTICE SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT

SUBCHAPTER XXIV—MATCHING GRANT PROGRAM FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ARMOR VESTS

§10530. Patrick Leahy Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Program

The program under this subchapter shall be known as the "Patrick Leahy Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Program".

(Pub. L. 90–351, title I, §2500, as added Pub. L. 116–18, §1(b), May 23, 2019, 133 Stat. 869.)

§10531. Program authorized

(a) In general

The Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance is authorized to make grants to States, units of local government, and Indian tribes to purchase armor vests for use by State, local, and tribal law enforcement officers and State and local court officers.

(b) Uses of funds

Grants awarded under this section shall be—

(1) distributed directly to the State, unit of local government, State or local court, or Indian tribe; and

(2) used for the purchase of armor vests for law enforcement officers in the jurisdiction of the grantee.

(c) Preferential consideration

In awarding grants under this subchapter, the Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance may give preferential consideration, if feasible, to an application from a jurisdiction that—

(1) has the greatest need for armor vests based on the percentage of law enforcement officers in the department who do not have access to a vest;

(2) has, or will institute, a mandatory wear policy that requires on-duty law enforcement officers to wear armor vests whenever feasible;

(3) has a violent crime rate at or above the national average as determined by the Federal Bureau of Investigation; and

(4) provides armor vests to law enforcement officers that are uniquely fitted for such officers, including vests uniquely fitted to individual female law enforcement officers; or

(5) has not received a block grant under the Local Law Enforcement Block Grant program described under the heading "Violent Crime Reduction Programs, State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance" of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1998 (Public Law 105–119).

(d) Minimum amount

Unless all eligible applications submitted by any State or unit of local government within such State for a grant under this section have been funded, such State, together with grantees within the State (other than Indian tribes), shall be allocated in each fiscal year under this section not less than 0.50 percent of the total amount appropriated in the fiscal year for grants pursuant to this section, except that the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands shall each be allocated .25 percent.

(e) Maximum amount

A qualifying State, unit of local government, or Indian tribe may not receive more than 5 percent of the total amount appropriated in each fiscal year for grants under this section, except that a State, together with the grantees within the State may not receive more than 20 percent of the total amount appropriated in each fiscal year for grants under this section.

(f) Matching funds

(1) In general

The portion of the costs of a program provided by a grant under subsection (a)—

(A) may not exceed 50 percent; and

(B) shall equal 50 percent, if—

(i) such grant is to a unit of local government with fewer than 100,000 residents;

(ii) the Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance determines that the quantity of vests to be purchased with such grant is reasonable; and

(iii) such portion does not cause such grant to violate the requirements of subsection (e).

(2) Indian assistance

Any funds appropriated by Congress for the activities of any agency of an Indian tribal government or the Bureau of Indian Affairs performing law enforcement functions on any Indian lands may be used to provide the non-Federal share of a matching requirement funded under this subsection.

(3) Limitation on matching funds

A State, unit of local government, or Indian tribe may not use funding received under any other Federal grant program to pay or defer the cost, in whole or in part, of the matching requirement under paragraph (1).

(4) Waiver

The Director may waive in whole or in part, the match requirement of paragraph (1) in the case of fiscal hardship, as determined by the Director.

(g) Allocation of funds

Funds available under this subchapter shall be awarded, without regard to subsection (c), to each qualifying unit of local government with fewer than 100,000 residents. Any remaining funds available under this subchapter shall be awarded to other qualifying applicants.

(h) Expiration of appropriated funds

(1) Definition

In this subsection, the term "appropriated funds" means any amounts that are appropriated for any of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 to carry out this subchapter.

(2) Expiration

All appropriated funds that are not obligated on or before December 31, 2022 shall be transferred to the General Fund of the Treasury not later than January 31, 2023.

(Pub. L. 90–351, title I, §2501, as added Pub. L. 105–181, §3(a)(3), June 16, 1998, 112 Stat. 513; amended Pub. L. 106–517, §3(a), (b), Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2407, 2408; Pub. L. 110–177, title III, §302(d), Jan. 7, 2008, 121 Stat. 2539; Pub. L. 111–8, div. B, title II, Mar. 11, 2009, 123 Stat. 583; Pub. L. 114–155, §§3, 5, 7, May 16, 2016, 130 Stat. 389, 390.)

References in Text

The Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1998, referred to in subsec. (c)(5), is Pub. L. 105–119, Nov. 26, 1997, 111 Stat. 2440. Provisions under the heading "Violent Crime Reduction Programs, State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance", 111 Stat. 2452, are not classified to the Code.

Codification

Section was formerly classified to section 3796ll of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare, prior to editorial reclassification and renumbering as this section.

Prior Provisions

A prior section 2501 of Pub. L. 90–351 was renumbered section 2601 and is classified to section 10541 of this title.

Amendments

2016—Subsec. (c)(2) to (5). Pub. L. 114–155, §7, substituted "; and" for "; or" at end of par. (3), added par. (4), and redesignated former par. (4) as (5).

Subsec. (f)(3), (4). Pub. L. 114–155, §5, added par. (3) and redesignated former par. (3) as (4).

Subsec. (h). Pub. L. 114–155, §3, added subsec. (h).

2009—Subsec. (f)(3). Pub. L. 111–8 added par. (3).

2008—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 110–177, §302(d)(1), inserted "and State and local court officers" after "tribal law enforcement officers".

Subsec. (b)(1). Pub. L. 110–177, §302(d)(2), inserted "State or local court," after "government,".

2000—Subsec. (f). Pub. L. 106–517, §3(a), designated first sentence as par. (1), inserted par. heading, substituted "subsection (a)—" and subpars. (A) and (B) for "subsection (a) may not exceed 50 percent.", and designated second sentence as par. (2) and inserted par. heading.

Subsec. (g). Pub. L. 106–517, §3(b), amended heading and text of subsec. (g) generally. Prior to amendment, text read as follows: "At least half of the funds available under this subchapter shall be awarded to units of local government with fewer than 100,000 residents."

Transfer of Functions

Effective Aug. 1, 2000, all functions of Director of Bureau of Justice Assistance, other than those enumerated in section 10142(3) through (6) of this title, transferred to Assistant Attorney General for Office of Justice Programs, see section 1000(a)(1) [title I, §108(b)] of Pub. L. 106–113, set out as a note under section 10141 of this title.

Findings of 2000 Amendments

Pub. L. 106–517, §2, Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2407, provided that: "Congress finds that—

"(1) the number of law enforcement officers who are killed in the line of duty would significantly decrease if every law enforcement officer in the United States had the protection of an armor vest;

"(2) according to studies, between 1985 and 1994, 709 law enforcement officers in the United States were killed in the line of duty;

"(3) the Federal Bureau of Investigation estimates that the risk of fatality to law enforcement officers while not wearing an armor vest is 14 times higher than for officers wearing an armor vest;

"(4) according to studies, between 1985 and 1994, bullet-resistant materials helped save the lives of more than 2,000 law enforcement officers in the United States; and

"(5) the Executive Committee for Indian Country Law Enforcement Improvements reports that violent crime in Indian country has risen sharply, despite a decrease in the national crime rate, and has concluded that there is a 'public safety crisis in Indian country'."

Findings and Purpose of 1998 Amendments

Pub. L. 105–181, §2, June 16, 1998, 112 Stat. 512, provided that:

"(a) Findings.—Congress finds that—

"(1) the number of law enforcement officers who are killed in the line of duty would significantly decrease if every law enforcement officer in the United States had the protection of an armor vest;

"(2) according to studies, between 1985 and 1994, 709 law enforcement officers in the United States were feloniously killed in the line of duty;

"(3) the Federal Bureau of Investigation estimates that the risk of fatality to law enforcement officers while not wearing an armor vest is 14 times higher than for officers wearing an armor vest;

"(4) the Department of Justice estimates that approximately 150,000 State, local, and tribal law enforcement officers, nearly 25 percent, are not issued body armor;

"(5) according to studies, between 1985 and 1994, bullet-resistant materials helped save the lives of more than 2,000 law enforcement officers in the United States; and

"(6) the Executive Committee for Indian Country Law Enforcement Improvements reports that violent crime in Indian country has risen sharply, despite a decrease in the national crime rate, and has concluded that there is a 'public safety crisis in Indian country'.

"(b) Purpose.—The purpose of this Act [see Short Title of 1998 Act note set out under section 10101 of this title] is to save lives of law enforcement officers by helping State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies provide officers with armor vests."

§10532. Applications

(a) In general

To request a grant under this subchapter, the chief executive of a State, unit of local government, or Indian tribe shall submit an application to the Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance in such form and containing such information as the Director may reasonably require.

(b) Regulations

Not later than 90 days after June 16, 1998, the Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance shall promulgate regulations to implement this section (including the information that must be included and the requirements that the States, units of local government, and Indian tribes must meet) in submitting the applications required under this section.

(c) Eligibility

A unit of local government that receives funding under the Local Law Enforcement Block Grant program (described under the heading "Violent Crime Reduction Programs, State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance" of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1998 (Public Law 105–119)) during a fiscal year in which it submits an application under this subchapter shall not be eligible for a grant under this subchapter unless the chief executive officer of such unit of local government certifies and provides an explanation to the Director that the unit of local government considered or will consider using funding received under the block grant program for any or all of the costs relating to the purchase of armor vests, but did not, or does not expect to use such funds for such purpose.

(d) Applications in conjunction with purchases

If an application under this section is submitted in conjunction with a transaction for the purchase of armor vests, grant amounts under this section may not be used to fund any portion of that purchase unless, before the application is submitted, the applicant—

(1) receives clear and conspicuous notice that receipt of the grant amounts requested in the application is uncertain; and

(2) expressly assumes the obligation to carry out the transaction, regardless of whether such amounts are received.

(Pub. L. 90–351, title I, §2502, as added Pub. L. 105–181, §3(a)(3), June 16, 1998, 112 Stat. 514; amended Pub. L. 106–517, §3(c), Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2408.)

References in Text

The Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1998, referred to in subsec. (c), is Pub. L. 105–119, Nov. 26, 1997, 111 Stat. 2440. Provisions under the heading "Violent Crime Reduction Programs, State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance", 111 Stat. 2452, are not classified to the Code.

Codification

Section was formerly classified to section 3796ll–1 of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare, prior to editorial reclassification and renumbering as this section.

Amendments

2000—Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 106–517 added subsec. (d).

Transfer of Functions

Effective Aug. 1, 2000, all functions of Director of Bureau of Justice Assistance, other than those enumerated in section 10142(3) through (6) of this title, transferred to Assistant Attorney General for Office of Justice Programs, see section 1000(a)(1) [title I, §108(b)] of Pub. L. 106–113, set out as a note under section 10141 of this title.

§10533. Definitions

For purposes of this subchapter—

(1) the term "armor vest" means—

(A) body armor, no less than Type I, which has been tested through the voluntary compliance testing program operated by the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), and found to meet or exceed the requirements of NIJ Standard 0101.03, or any subsequent revision of such standard; or

(B) body armor that has been tested through the voluntary compliance testing program, and found to meet or exceed the requirements of NIJ Standard 0115.00, or any revision of such standard;


(2) the term "body armor" means any product sold or offered for sale as personal protective body covering intended to protect against gunfire, stabbing, or other physical harm;

(3) the term "State" means each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands;

(4) the term "unit of local government" means a county, municipality, town, township, village, parish, borough, or other unit of general government below the State level;

(5) the term "Indian tribe" has the same meaning as in section 5304(e) of title 25; and

(6) the term "law enforcement officer" means any officer, agent, or employee of a State, unit of local government, or Indian tribe authorized by law or by a government agency to engage in or supervise the prevention, detection, or investigation of any violation of criminal law, or authorized by law to supervise sentenced criminal offenders.

(Pub. L. 90–351, title I, §2503, as added Pub. L. 105–181, §3(a)(3), June 16, 1998, 112 Stat. 514; amended Pub. L. 106–517, §3(d), Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2408.)

Codification

Section was formerly classified to section 3796ll–2 of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare, prior to editorial reclassification and renumbering as this section.

Amendments

2000—Par. (1). Pub. L. 106–517 designated provisions after " 'armor vest' means" as subpar. (A) and added subpar. (B).

Interim Definition of Armor Vest

Pub. L. 106–517, §3(e), Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2408, provided that: "For purposes of part Y of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 [34 U.S.C. 10531 et seq.], as amended by this Act, the meaning of the term 'armor vest' (as defined in section 2503 of such Act (42 U.S.C. 3796ll–2) [now 34 U.S.C. 10533]) shall, until the date on which a final NIJ Standard 0115.00 is first fully approved and implemented, also include body armor which has been found to meet or exceed the requirements for protection against stabbing established by the State in which the grantee is located."

§10534. James Guelff and Chris McCurley Body Armor Act of 2002

(a) Short title

This section may be cited as the "James Guelff and Chris McCurley Body Armor Act of 2002".

(b) Findings

Congress finds that—

(1) nationally, police officers and ordinary citizens are facing increased danger as criminals use more deadly weaponry, body armor, and other sophisticated assault gear;

(2) crime at the local level is exacerbated by the interstate movement of body armor and other assault gear;

(3) there is a traffic in body armor moving in or otherwise affecting interstate commerce, and existing Federal controls over such traffic do not adequately enable the States to control this traffic within their own borders through the exercise of their police power;

(4) recent incidents, such as the murder of San Francisco Police Officer James Guelff by an assailant wearing 2 layers of body armor, a 1997 bank shoot out in north Hollywood, California, between police and 2 heavily armed suspects outfitted in body armor, and the 1997 murder of Captain Chris McCurley of the Etowah County, Alabama Drug Task Force by a drug dealer shielded by protective body armor, demonstrate the serious threat to community safety posed by criminals who wear body armor during the commission of a violent crime;

(5) of the approximately 1,500 officers killed in the line of duty since 1980, more than 30 percent could have been saved by body armor, and the risk of dying from gunfire is 14 times higher for an officer without a bulletproof vest;

(6) the Department of Justice has estimated that 25 percent of State and local police are not issued body armor;

(7) the Federal Government is well-equipped to grant local police departments access to body armor that is no longer needed by Federal agencies; and

(8) Congress has the power, under the interstate commerce clause and other provisions of the Constitution of the United States, to enact legislation to regulate interstate commerce that affects the integrity and safety of our communities.

(c) Definitions

In this section:

(1) Body armor

The term "body armor" means any product sold or offered for sale, in interstate or foreign commerce, as personal protective body covering intended to protect against gunfire, regardless of whether the product is to be worn alone or is sold as a complement to another product or garment.

(2) Law enforcement agency

The term "law enforcement agency" means an agency of the United States, a State, or a political subdivision of a State, authorized by law or by a government agency to engage in or supervise the prevention, detection, investigation, or prosecution of any violation of criminal law.

(3) Law enforcement officer

The term "law enforcement officer" means any officer, agent, or employee of the United States, a State, or a political subdivision of a State, authorized by law or by a government agency to engage in or supervise the prevention, detection, investigation, or prosecution of any violation of criminal law.

(d) Amendment of sentencing guidelines with respect to body armor

(1) In general

Pursuant to its authority under section 994(p) of title 28, the United States Sentencing Commission shall review and amend the Federal sentencing guidelines and the policy statements of the Commission, as appropriate, to provide an appropriate sentencing enhancement for any crime of violence (as defined in section 16 of title 18) or drug trafficking crime (as defined in section 924(c) of title 18) (including a crime of violence or drug trafficking crime that provides for an enhanced punishment if committed by the use of a deadly or dangerous weapon or device) in which the defendant used body armor.

(2) Sense of Congress

It is the sense of Congress that any sentencing enhancement under this subsection should be at least 2 levels.

(e) Omitted

(f) Donation of Federal surplus body armor

(1) Definitions

In this subsection, the terms "Federal agency" and "surplus property" have the meanings given such terms under section 102 of title 40.

(2) Donation of body armor

Notwithstanding sections 541–555 of title 40, the head of a Federal agency may donate body armor directly to any State or local law enforcement agency, if such body armor—

(A) is in serviceable condition;

(B) is surplus property; and

(C) meets or exceeds the requirements of National Institute of Justice Standard 0101.03 (as in effect on November 2, 2002).

(3) Notice to Administrator

The head of a Federal agency who donates body armor under this subsection shall submit to the Administrator of General Services a written notice identifying the amount of body armor donated and each State or local law enforcement agency that received the body armor.

(4) Donation by certain officers

(A) Department of Justice

In the administration of this subsection with respect to the Department of Justice, in addition to any other officer of the Department of Justice designated by the Attorney General, the following officers may act as the head of a Federal agency:

(i) The Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration.

(ii) The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

(iii) The Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

(iv) The Director of the United States Marshals Service.

(B) Department of the Treasury

In the administration of this subsection with respect to the Department of the Treasury, in addition to any other officer of the Department of the Treasury designated by the Secretary of the Treasury, the following officers may act as the head of a Federal agency:

(i) The Director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms.

(ii) The Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

(iii) The Director of the United States Secret Service.

(5) No liability

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the United States shall not be liable for any harm occurring in connection with the use or misuse of any body armor donated under this subsection.

(Pub. L. 107–273, div. C, title I, §11009, Nov. 2, 2002, 116 Stat. 1819; Pub. L. 114–125, title VIII, §802(d)(2), Feb. 24, 2016, 130 Stat. 210.)

Codification

Section is comprised of section 11009 of Pub. L. 107–273. Subsec. (e) of section 11009 of Pub. L. 107–273 enacted section 931 of Title 18, Crimes and Criminal Procedure, and amended sections 921 and 924 of Title 18.

Section was enacted as part of the 21st Century Department of Justice Appropriations Authorization Act, and not as part of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 which comprises this chapter.

In subsec. (f), "section 102 of title 40" substituted for "section 3 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 (40 U.S.C. 472)" in par. (1), and "sections 541–555 of title 40" substituted for "section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 (40 U.S.C. 484)" in par. (2), on authority of Pub. L. 107–217, §5(c), Aug. 21, 2002, 116 Stat. 1303, the first section of which enacted Title 40, Public Buildings, Property, and Works.

Section was formerly classified to section 3796ll–3 of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare, prior to editorial reclassification and renumbering as this section.

Change of Name

"Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection" substituted for "Commissioner of Customs" in subsec. (f)(4)(B)(ii) on authority of section 802(d)(2) of Pub. L. 114–125, set out as a note under section 211 of Title 6, Domestic Security.

Transfer of Functions

For transfer of authorities, functions, personnel, and assets of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, including the related functions of the Secretary of the Treasury, to the Department of Justice, see section 531(c) of Title 6, Domestic Security, and section 599A(c)(1) of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

For transfer of functions, personnel, assets, and liabilities of the United States Customs Service of the Department of the Treasury, including functions of the Secretary of the Treasury relating thereto, to the Secretary of Homeland Security, and for treatment of related references, see sections 203(1), 551(d), 552(d), and 557 of Title 6, Domestic Security, and the Department of Homeland Security Reorganization Plan of November 25, 2002, as modified, set out as a note under section 542 of Title 6. For establishment of U.S. Customs and Border Protection in the Department of Homeland Security, treated as if included in Pub. L. 107–296 as of Nov. 25, 2002, see section 211 of Title 6, as amended generally by Pub. L. 114–125, and section 802(b) of Pub. L. 114–125, set out as a note under section 211 of Title 6.

For transfer of the functions, personnel, assets, and obligations of the United States Secret Service, including the functions of the Secretary of the Treasury relating thereto, to the Secretary of Homeland Security, and for treatment of related references, see sections 381, 551(d), 552(d), and 557 of Title 6, Domestic Security, and the Department of Homeland Security Reorganization Plan of November 25, 2002, as modified, set out as a note under section 542 of Title 6.

Abolition of Immigration and Naturalization Service and Transfer of Functions

For abolition of Immigration and Naturalization Service, transfer of functions, and treatment of related references, see note set out under section 1551 of Title 8, Aliens and Nationality.