[USC02] 6 USC CHAPTER 4, SUBCHAPTER IV, Part D: Hazardous Material and Pipeline Security
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6 USC CHAPTER 4, SUBCHAPTER IV, Part D: Hazardous Material and Pipeline Security
From Title 6—DOMESTIC SECURITYCHAPTER 4—TRANSPORTATION SECURITYSUBCHAPTER IV—SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

Part D—Hazardous Material and Pipeline Security

§1201. Railroad routing of security-sensitive materials

(a) In general

Not later than 9 months after August 3, 2007, the Secretary of Transportation, in consultation with the Secretary, shall publish a final rule based on the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration's Notice of Proposed Rulemaking published on December 21, 2006, entitled "Hazardous Materials: Enhancing Railroad Transportation Safety and Security for Hazardous Materials Shipments". The final rule shall incorporate the requirements of this section and, as appropriate, public comments received during the comment period of the rulemaking.

(b) Security-sensitive materials commodity data

The Secretary of Transportation shall ensure that the final rule requires each railroad carrier transporting security-sensitive materials in commerce to, no later than 90 days after the end of each calendar year, compile security-sensitive materials commodity data. Such data must be collected by route, line segment, or series of line segments, as aggregated by the railroad carrier. Within the railroad carrier selected route, the commodity data must identify the geographic location of the route and the total number of shipments by the United Nations identification number for the security-sensitive materials.

(c) Railroad transportation route analysis for security-sensitive materials

The Secretary of Transportation shall ensure that the final rule requires each railroad carrier transporting security-sensitive materials in commerce to, for each calendar year, provide a written analysis of the safety and security risks for the transportation routes identified in the security-sensitive materials commodity data collected as required by subsection (b). The safety and security risks present shall be analyzed for the route, railroad facilities, railroad storage facilities, and high-consequence targets along or in proximity to the route.

(d) Alternative route analysis for security-sensitive materials

The Secretary of Transportation shall ensure that the final rule requires each railroad carrier transporting security-sensitive materials in commerce to—

(1) for each calendar year—

(A) identify practicable alternative routes over which the railroad carrier has authority to operate as compared to the current route for such a shipment analyzed under subsection (c); and

(B) perform a safety and security risk assessment of the alternative route for comparison to the route analysis specified in subsection (c);


(2) ensure that the analysis under paragraph (1) includes—

(A) identification of safety and security risks for an alternative route;

(B) comparison of those risks identified under subparagraph (A) to the primary railroad transportation route, including the risk of a catastrophic release from a shipment traveling along the alternate route compared to the primary route;

(C) any remediation or mitigation measures implemented on the primary or alternative route; and

(D) potential economic effects of using an alternative route; and


(3) consider when determining the practicable alternative routes under paragraph (1)(A) the use of interchange agreements with other railroad carriers.

(e) Alternative route selection for security-sensitive materials

The Secretary of Transportation shall ensure that the final rule requires each railroad carrier transporting security-sensitive materials in commerce to use the analysis required by subsections (c) and (d) to select the safest and most secure route to be used in transporting security-sensitive materials.

(f) Review

The Secretary of Transportation shall ensure that the final rule requires each railroad carrier transporting security-sensitive materials in commerce to annually review and select the practicable route posing the least overall safety and security risk in accordance with this section. The railroad carrier must retain in writing all route review and selection decision documentation and restrict the distribution, disclosure, and availability of information contained in the route analysis to appropriate persons. This documentation should include, but is not limited to, comparative analyses, charts, graphics, or railroad system maps.

(g) Retrospective analysis

The Secretary of Transportation shall ensure that the final rule requires each railroad carrier transporting security-sensitive materials in commerce to, not less than once every 3 years, analyze the route selection determinations required under this section. Such an analysis shall include a comprehensive, systemwide review of all operational changes, infrastructure modifications, traffic adjustments, changes in the nature of high-consequence targets located along or in proximity to the route, or other changes affecting the safety and security of the movements of security-sensitive materials that were implemented since the previous analysis was completed.

(h) Consultation

In carrying out subsection (c), railroad carriers transporting security-sensitive materials in commerce shall seek relevant information from State, local, and tribal officials, as appropriate, regarding security risks to high-consequence targets along or in proximity to a route used by a railroad carrier to transport security-sensitive materials.

(i) Definitions

In this section:

(1) The term "route" includes storage facilities and trackage used by railroad cars in transportation in commerce.

(2) The term "high-consequence target" means a property, natural resource, location, area, or other target designated by the Secretary that is a viable terrorist target of national significance, which may include a facility or specific critical infrastructure, the attack of which by railroad could result in—

(A) catastrophic loss of life;

(B) significant damage to national security or defense capabilities; or

(C) national economic harm.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XV, §1551, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 469.)

§1202. Railroad security-sensitive material tracking

(a) Communications

(1) In general

In conjunction with the research and development program established under section 1168 of this title and consistent with the results of research relating to wireless and other tracking technologies, the Secretary, in consultation with the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration, shall develop a program that will encourage the equipping of railroad cars transporting security-sensitive materials, as defined in section 1151 of this title, with technology that provides—

(A) car position location and tracking capabilities; and

(B) notification of railroad car depressurization, breach, unsafe temperature, or release of hazardous materials, as appropriate.

(2) Coordination

In developing the program required by paragraph (1), the Secretary shall—

(A) consult with the Secretary of Transportation to coordinate the program with any ongoing or planned efforts for railroad car tracking at the Department of Transportation; and

(B) ensure that the program is consistent with recommendations and findings of the Department of Homeland Security's hazardous material railroad tank car tracking pilot programs.

(b) Funding

From the amounts appropriated pursuant to 114(w) of title 49, there shall be made available to the Secretary to carry out this section—

(1) $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2008;

(2) $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2009; and

(3) $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2010.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XV, §1552, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 471.)

§1203. Hazardous materials highway routing

(a) Route plan guidance

Not later than 1 year after August 3, 2007, the Secretary of Transportation, in consultation with the Secretary, shall—

(1) document existing and proposed routes for the transportation of radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials by motor carrier, and develop a framework for using a geographic information system-based approach to characterize routes in the national hazardous materials route registry;

(2) assess and characterize existing and proposed routes for the transportation of radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials by motor carrier for the purpose of identifying measurable criteria for selecting routes based on safety and security concerns;

(3) analyze current route-related hazardous materials regulations in the United States, Canada, and Mexico to identify cross-border differences and conflicting regulations;

(4) document the safety and security concerns of the public, motor carriers, and State, local, territorial, and tribal governments about the highway routing of hazardous materials;

(5) prepare guidance materials for State officials to assist them in identifying and reducing both safety concerns and security risks when designating highway routes for hazardous materials consistent with the 13 safety-based nonradioactive materials routing criteria and radioactive materials routing criteria in subpart C part 397 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations;

(6) develop a tool that will enable State officials to examine potential routes for the highway transportation of hazardous materials, assess specific security risks associated with each route, and explore alternative mitigation measures; and

(7) transmit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the actions taken to fulfill paragraphs (1) through (6) and any recommended changes to the routing requirements for the highway transportation of hazardous materials in part 397 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations.

(b) Route plans

(1) Assessment

Not later than 1 year after August 3, 2007, the Secretary of Transportation shall complete an assessment of the safety and national security benefits achieved under existing requirements for route plans, in written or electronic format, for explosives and radioactive materials. The assessment shall, at a minimum—

(A) compare the percentage of Department of Transportation recordable incidents and the severity of such incidents for shipments of explosives and radioactive materials for which such route plans are required with the percentage of recordable incidents and the severity of such incidents for shipments of explosives and radioactive materials not subject to such route plans; and

(B) quantify the security and safety benefits, feasibility, and costs of requiring each motor carrier that is required to have a hazardous material safety permit under part 385 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, to maintain, follow, and carry such a route plan that meets the requirements of section 397.101 of that title when transporting the type and quantity of hazardous materials described in section 385.403, taking into account the various segments of the motor carrier industry, including tank truck, truckload and less than truckload carriers.

(2) Report

Not later than 1 year after August 3, 2007, the Secretary of Transportation shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees containing the findings and conclusions of the assessment.

(c) Requirement

The Secretary shall require motor carriers that have a hazardous material safety permit under part 385 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, to maintain, follow, and carry a route plan, in written or electronic format, that meets the requirements of section 397.101 of that title when transporting the type and quantity of hazardous materials described in section 385.403 if the Secretary determines, under the assessment required in subsection (b), that such a requirement would enhance security and safety without imposing unreasonable costs or burdens upon motor carriers.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XV, §1553, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 472.)

§1204. Motor carrier security-sensitive material tracking

(a) Communications

(1) In general

Not later than 6 months after August 3, 2007, consistent with the findings of the Transportation Security Administration's hazardous materials truck security pilot program, the Secretary, through the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration and in consultation with the Secretary of Transportation, shall develop a program to facilitate the tracking of motor carrier shipments of security-sensitive materials and to equip vehicles used in such shipments with technology that provides—

(A) frequent or continuous communications;

(B) vehicle position location and tracking capabilities; and

(C) a feature that allows a driver of such vehicles to broadcast an emergency distress signal.

(2) Considerations

In developing the program required by paragraph (1), the Secretary shall—

(A) consult with the Secretary of Transportation to coordinate the program with any ongoing or planned efforts for motor carrier or security-sensitive materials tracking at the Department of Transportation;

(B) take into consideration the recommendations and findings of the report on the hazardous material safety and security operational field test released by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration on November 11, 2004; and

(C) evaluate—

(i) any new information related to the costs and benefits of deploying, equipping, and utilizing tracking technology, including portable tracking technology, for motor carriers transporting security-sensitive materials not included in the hazardous material safety and security operational field test report released by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration on November 11, 2004;

(ii) the ability of tracking technology to resist tampering and disabling;

(iii) the capability of tracking technology to collect, display, and store information regarding the movement of shipments of security-sensitive materials by commercial motor vehicles;

(iv) the appropriate range of contact intervals between the tracking technology and a commercial motor vehicle transporting security-sensitive materials;

(v) technology that allows the installation by a motor carrier of concealed electronic devices on commercial motor vehicles that can be activated by law enforcement authorities to disable the vehicle or alert emergency response resources to locate and recover security-sensitive materials in the event of loss or theft of such materials;

(vi) whether installation of the technology described in clause (v) should be incorporated into the program under paragraph (1);

(vii) the costs, benefits, and practicality of such technology described in clause (v) in the context of the overall benefit to national security, including commerce in transportation; and

(viii) other systems and information the Secretary determines appropriate.

(b) Funding

From the amounts appropriated pursuant to section 114(w) 1 of title 49, there shall be made available to the Secretary to carry out this section—

(1) $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2008 of which $3,000,000 may be used for equipment;

(2) $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2009 of which $3,000,000 may be used for equipment; and

(3) $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2010 of which $3,000,000 may be used for equipment.

(c) Report

Not later than 1 year after the issuance of regulations under subsection (a), the Secretary shall issue a report to the appropriate congressional committees on the program developed and evaluation carried out under this section.

(d) Limitation

The Secretary may not mandate the installation or utilization of a technology described under this section without additional congressional authority provided after August 3, 2007.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XV, §1554, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 473.)


Editorial Notes

References in Text

Section 114(w) of title 49, referred to in subsec. (b)(1), was redesignated section 114(v) of title 49 by Pub. L. 115–254, div. K, §1904(b)(1)(I), Oct. 5, 2018, 132 Stat. 3545.

1 See References in Text note below.

§1205. Hazardous materials security inspections and study

(a) In general

The Secretary of Transportation shall consult with the Secretary to limit, to the extent practicable, duplicative reviews of the hazardous materials security plans required under part 172, title 49, Code of Federal Regulations.

(b) Transportation costs study

Within 1 year after August 3, 2007, the Secretary of Transportation, in conjunction with the Secretary, shall study to what extent the insurance, security, and safety costs borne by railroad carriers, motor carriers, pipeline carriers, air carriers, and maritime carriers associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are reflected in the rates paid by offerors of such commodities as compared to the costs and rates, respectively, for the transportation of nonhazardous materials.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XV, §1555, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 475.)

§1206. Use of transportation security card in hazmat licensing

(1) Background check

An individual who has a valid transportation employee identification card issued by the Secretary under section 70105 of title 46 shall be deemed to have met the background records check required under section 5103a of title 49.

(2) State review

Nothing in this section prevents or preempts a State from conducting a criminal records check of an individual that has applied for a license to operate a motor vehicle transporting in commerce a hazardous material.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XV, §1556(b), Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 475.)

§1207. Pipeline security inspections and enforcement

(a) In general

Not later than 9 months after August 3, 2007, consistent with the Annex to the Memorandum of Understanding executed on August 9, 2006, between the Department of Transportation and the Department, the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Transportation, shall establish a program for reviewing pipeline operator adoption of recommendations of the September 5, 2002, Department of Transportation Research and Special Programs Administration's Pipeline Security Information Circular, including the review of pipeline security plans and critical facility inspections.

(b) Review and inspection

Not later than 12 months after August 3, 2007, the Secretary and the Secretary of Transportation shall develop and implement a plan for reviewing the pipeline security plans and an inspection of the critical facilities of the 100 most critical pipeline operators covered by the September 5, 2002, circular, where such facilities have not been inspected for security purposes since September 5, 2002, by either the Department or the Department of Transportation.

(c) Compliance review methodology

In reviewing pipeline operator compliance under subsections (a) and (b), risk assessment methodologies shall be used to prioritize risks and to target inspection and enforcement actions to the highest risk pipeline assets.

(d) Regulations

Not later than 18 months after August 3, 2007, the Secretary and the Secretary of Transportation shall develop and transmit to pipeline operators security recommendations for natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines and pipeline facilities. If the Secretary determines that regulations are appropriate, the Secretary shall consult with the Secretary of Transportation on the extent of risk and appropriate mitigation measures, and the Secretary or the Secretary of Transportation, consistent with the Annex to the Memorandum of Understanding executed on August 9, 2006, shall promulgate such regulations and carry out necessary inspection and enforcement actions. Any regulations shall incorporate the guidance provided to pipeline operators by the September 5, 2002, Department of Transportation Research and Special Programs Administration's Pipeline Security Information Circular and contain additional requirements as necessary based upon the results of the inspections performed under subsection (b). The regulations shall include the imposition of civil penalties for noncompliance.

(e) Funding

From the amounts appropriated pursuant to section 114(w) 1 of title 49, there shall be made available to the Secretary to carry out this section—

(1) $2,000,000 for fiscal year 2008;

(2) $2,000,000 for fiscal year 2009; and

(3) $2,000,000 for fiscal year 2010.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XV, §1557, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 475.)


Editorial Notes

References in Text

Section 114(w) of title 49, referred to in subsec. (e)(1), was redesignated section 114(v) of title 49 by Pub. L. 115–254, div. K, §1904(b)(1)(I), Oct. 5, 2018, 132 Stat. 3545.

1 See References in Text note below.

§1208. Pipeline security and incident recovery plan

(a) In general

The Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Transportation and the Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, and in accordance with the Annex to the Memorandum of Understanding executed on August 9, 2006, the National Strategy for Transportation Security, and Homeland Security Presidential Directive–7, shall develop a pipeline security and incident recovery protocols plan. The plan shall include—

(1) for the Government to provide increased security support to the most critical interstate and intrastate natural gas and hazardous liquid transmission pipeline infrastructure and operations as determined under section 1207 of this title when—

(A) under severe security threat levels of alert; or

(B) under specific security threat information relating to such pipeline infrastructure or operations exists; and


(2) an incident recovery protocol plan, developed in conjunction with interstate and intrastate transmission and distribution pipeline operators and terminals and facilities operators connected to pipelines, to develop protocols to ensure the continued transportation of natural gas and hazardous liquids to essential markets and for essential public health or national defense uses in the event of an incident affecting the interstate and intrastate natural gas and hazardous liquid transmission and distribution pipeline system, which shall include protocols for restoring essential services supporting pipelines and granting access to pipeline operators for pipeline infrastructure repair, replacement, or bypass following an incident.

(b) Existing private and public sector efforts

The plan shall take into account actions taken or planned by both private and public entities to address identified pipeline security issues and assess the effective integration of such actions.

(c) Consultation

In developing the plan under subsection (a), the Secretary shall consult with the Secretary of Transportation, interstate and intrastate transmission and distribution pipeline operators, nonprofit employee organizations representing pipeline employees, emergency responders, offerors, State pipeline safety agencies, public safety officials, and other relevant parties.

(d) Report

(1) Contents

Not later than 2 years after August 3, 2007, the Secretary shall transmit to the appropriate congressional committees a report containing the plan required by subsection (a), including an estimate of the private and public sector costs to implement any recommendations.

(2) Format

The Secretary may submit the report in both classified and redacted formats if the Secretary determines that such action is appropriate or necessary.

(Pub. L. 110–53, title XV, §1558, Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 476.)