[USC02] 12 USC CHAPTER 53, SUBCHAPTER V, Part G: Regulatory Improvements
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TEXT OF PART V OF SUBTITLE A (3001 ET SEQ.), EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2022, CURRENTLY SET OUT AS A PREVIEW

12 USC CHAPTER 53, SUBCHAPTER V, Part G: Regulatory Improvements
From Title 12—BANKS AND BANKINGCHAPTER 53—WALL STREET REFORM AND CONSUMER PROTECTIONSUBCHAPTER V—BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION

Part G—Regulatory Improvements

§5601. Remittance transfers

(a) Omitted

(b) Automated clearinghouse system

(1) Expansion of system

The Board of Governors shall work with the Federal reserve banks and the Department of the Treasury to expand the use of the automated clearinghouse system and other payment mechanisms for remittance transfers to foreign countries, with a focus on countries that receive significant remittance transfers from the United States, based on—

(A) the number, volume, and size of such transfers;

(B) the significance of the volume of such transfers relative to the external financial flows of the receiving country, including—

(i) the total amount transferred; and

(ii) the total volume of payments made by United States Government agencies to beneficiaries and retirees living abroad;


(C) the feasibility of such an expansion; and

(D) the ability of the Federal Reserve System to establish payment gateways in different geographic regions and currency zones to receive remittance transfers and route them through the payments systems in the destination countries.

(2) Report to Congress

Not later than one calendar year after July 21, 2010, and on April 30 biennially thereafter during the 10-year period beginning on July 21, 2010, the Board of Governors shall submit a report to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the Senate and the Committee on Financial Services of the House of Representatives on the status of the automated clearinghouse system and its progress in complying with the requirements of this subsection. The report shall include an analysis of adoption rates of International ACH Transactions rules and formats, the efficacy of increasing adoption rates, and potential recommendations to increase adoption.

(c) Expansion of financial institution provision of remittance transfers

(1) Provision of guidelines to institutions

Each of the Federal banking agencies and the National Credit Union Administration shall provide guidelines to financial institutions under the jurisdiction of the agency regarding the offering of low-cost remittance transfers and no-cost or low-cost basic consumer accounts, as well as agency services to remittance transfer providers.

(2) Assistance to Financial Literacy Commission 1

As part of its 2 duties as members of the Financial Literacy and Education Commission, the Bureau, the Federal banking agencies, and the National Credit Union Administration shall assist the Financial Literacy and Education Commission in executing the Strategy for Assuring Financial Empowerment (or the "SAFE Strategy"), as it relates to remittances.

(d) Omitted

(e) Report on feasibility of and impediments to use of remittance history in calculation of credit score

Before the end of the 365-day period beginning on July 21, 2010, the Director shall submit a report to the President, the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the Senate, and the Committee on Financial Services of the House of Representatives regarding—

(1) the manner in which the remittance history of a consumer could be used to enhance the credit score of the consumer;

(2) the current legal and business model barriers and impediments that impede the use of the remittance history of the consumer to enhance the credit score of the consumer; and

(3) recommendations on the manner in which maximum transparency and disclosure to consumers of exchange rates for remittance transfers subject to this title 3 and the amendments made by this title 3 may be accomplished, whether or not such exchange rates are known at the time of origination or payment by the consumer for the remittance transfer, including disclosure to the sender of the actual exchange rate used and the amount of currency that the recipient of the remittance transfer received, using the values of the currency into which the funds were exchanged, as contained in sections 1693o–1(a)(2)(D) 3 and 1693o–1(a)(3) of title 15 (as amended by this section).

(Pub. L. 111–203, title X, §1073, July 21, 2010, 124 Stat. 2060.)


Editorial Notes

References in Text

This title, where footnoted in subsec. (e)(3), is title X of Pub. L. 111–203, July 21, 2010, 124 Stat. 1955, known as the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010, which enacted this subchapter and enacted, amended, and repealed numerous other sections and notes in the Code. For complete classification of title X to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 5301 of this title and Tables.

Section 1693o–1(a)(2) of title 15, referred to in subsec. (e)(3), does not contain a subpar. (D).

Codification

Section is comprised of section 1073 of Pub. L. 111–203. Subsecs. (a) and (d) of section 1073 of Pub. L. 111–203 enacted section 1693o–1 of Title 15, Commerce and Trade, amended section 1757 of this title and sections 1693, 1693b, 1693p, 1693q, and 1693r of Title 15, and amended provisions set out as a note under section 1693 of Title 15.


Statutory Notes and Related Subsidiaries

Effective Date

Part effective 1 day after July 21, 2010, except as otherwise provided, see section 4 of Pub. L. 111–203, set out as a note under section 5301 of this title.

1 So in original. Probably should be "Financial Literacy and Education Commission".

2 So in original. Probably should be "their".

3 See References in Text note below.

§5602. Reverse mortgage study and regulations

(a) Study

Not later than 1 year after the designated transfer date, the Bureau shall conduct a study on reverse mortgage transactions.

(b) Regulations

(1) In general

If the Bureau determines through the study required under subsection (a) that conditions or limitations on reverse mortgage transactions are necessary or appropriate for accomplishing the purposes and objectives of this title,1 including protecting borrowers with respect to the obtaining of reverse mortgage loans for the purpose of funding investments, annuities, and other investment products and the suitability of a borrower in obtaining a reverse mortgage for such purpose.2

(2) Identified practices and integrated disclosures

The regulations prescribed under paragraph (1) may, as the Bureau may so determine—

(A) identify any practice as unfair, deceptive, or abusive in connection with a reverse mortgage transaction; and

(B) provide for an integrated disclosure standard and model disclosures for reverse mortgage transactions, consistent with section 4302(d),1 that combines the relevant disclosures required under the Truth in Lending Act (15 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act [12 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.], with the disclosures required to be provided to consumers for Home Equity Conversion Mortgages under section 1715z–20 of this title.

(c) Rule of construction

This section shall not be construed as limiting the authority of the Bureau to issue regulations, orders, or guidance that apply to reverse mortgages prior to the completion of the study required under subsection (a).

(Pub. L. 111–203, title X, §1076, July 21, 2010, 124 Stat. 2075.)


Editorial Notes

References in Text

This title, referred to in subsec. (b)(1), is title X of Pub. L. 111–203, July 21, 2010, 124 Stat. 1955, known as the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010, which enacted this subchapter and enacted, amended, and repealed numerous other sections and notes in the Code. For complete classification of title X to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 5301 of this title and Tables.

Section 4302(d), referred to in subsec. (b)(2)(B), probably was a reference to section 4302(d) of the House Engrossed version of H.R. 4173, 111th Congress. A later version of H.R. 4173 was enacted as Pub. L. 111–203, and as so enacted, doesn't contain a section 4302. However, section 1032(f) of Pub. L. 111–203, which is classified to section 5532(f) of this title, contains substantially similar provisions to the section 4302(d) that was probably referred to.

The Truth in Lending Act, referred to in subsec. (b)(2)(B), is title I of Pub. L. 90–321, May 29, 1968, 82 Stat. 146, which is classified generally to subchapter I (§1601 et seq.) of chapter 41 of Title 15, Commerce and Trade. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 1601 of Title 15 and Tables.

The Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, referred to in subsec. (b)(2)(B), probably means the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act of 1974, Pub. L. 93–533, Dec. 22, 1974, 88 Stat. 1724, which is classified principally to chapter 27 (§2601 et seq.) of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 2601 of this title and Tables.

1 See References in Text note below.

2 So in original. Sentence does not appear to be complete.

§5603. Review, report, and program with respect to exchange facilitators

(a) Review

The Director shall review all Federal laws and regulations relating to the protection of consumers who use exchange facilitators for transactions primarily for personal, family, or household purposes.

(b) Report

Not later than 1 year after the designated transfer date, the Director shall submit to Congress a report describing—

(1) recommendations for legislation to ensure the appropriate protection of consumers who use exchange facilitators for transactions primarily for personal, family, or household purposes;

(2) recommendations for updating the regulations of Federal departments and agencies to ensure the appropriate protection of such consumers; and

(3) recommendations for regulations to ensure the appropriate protection of such consumers.

(c) Program

Not later than 2 years after the date of the submission of the report under subsection (b), the Bureau shall, consistent with part B, propose regulations or otherwise establish a program to protect consumers who use exchange facilitators.

(d) Exchange facilitator defined

In this section, the term "exchange facilitator" means a person that—

(1) facilitates, for a fee, an exchange of like kind property by entering into an agreement with a taxpayer by which the exchange facilitator acquires from the taxpayer the contractual rights to sell the taxpayer's relinquished property and transfers a replacement property to the taxpayer as a qualified intermediary (within the meaning of Treasury Regulations section 1.1031(k)–1(g)(4)) or enters into an agreement with the taxpayer to take title to a property as an exchange accommodation titleholder (within the meaning of Revenue Procedure 2000–37) or enters into an agreement with a taxpayer to act as a qualified trustee or qualified escrow holder (within the meaning of Treasury Regulations section 1.1031(k)–1(g)(3));

(2) maintains an office for the purpose of soliciting business to perform the services described in paragraph (1); or

(3) advertises any of the services described in paragraph (1) or solicits clients in printed publications, direct mail, television or radio advertisements, telephone calls, facsimile transmissions, or other electronic communications directed to the general public for purposes of providing any such services.

(Pub. L. 111–203, title X, §1079, July 21, 2010, 124 Stat. 2077.)