[USC02] 16 USC CHAPTER 95, SUBCHAPTER IV: PROGRAMS TO ADDRESS THE ESCALATING WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING CRISIS
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16 USC CHAPTER 95, SUBCHAPTER IV: PROGRAMS TO ADDRESS THE ESCALATING WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING CRISIS
From Title 16—CONSERVATIONCHAPTER 95—ELIMINATE, NEUTRALIZE, AND DISRUPT WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING

SUBCHAPTER IV—PROGRAMS TO ADDRESS THE ESCALATING WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING CRISIS

§7641. Anti-poaching programs

(a) Wildlife law enforcement professional training and coordination activities

The Secretary of State and the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, in collaboration with the heads of other relevant United States agencies and nongovernmental partners where appropriate, may provide assistance to focus countries to carry out the recommendations made in the strategic plan required by section 7631(a)(2) of this title, among other goals, to improve the effectiveness of wildlife law enforcement in regions and countries that have demonstrated capacity, willingness, and need for assistance.

(b) Sense of Congress regarding security assistance to counter wildlife trafficking and poaching in Africa

It is the sense of Congress that the United States should continue to provide defense articles (not including significant military equipment), defense services, and related training to appropriate security forces of countries of Africa for the purposes of countering wildlife trafficking and poaching.

(Pub. L. 114–231, title IV, §401, Oct. 7, 2016, 130 Stat. 954.)

§7642. Anti-trafficking programs

(a) Investigative capacity building

The Secretary of State and the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, in collaboration with the heads of other relevant United States agencies and communities, regions, and governments in focus countries, may design and implement programs in focus countries to carry out the recommendations made in the strategic plan required under section 7631(a)(2) of this title among other goals, with clear and measurable targets and indicators of success, to increase the capacity of wildlife law enforcement and customs and border security officers in focus countries.

(b) Transnational programs

The Secretary of State and the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, in collaboration with other relevant United States agencies, nongovernmental partners, and international bodies, and in collaboration with communities, regions, and governments in focus countries, may design and implement programs, including support for Wildlife Enforcement Networks, in focus countries to carry out the recommendations made in the strategic plan required under section 7631(a)(2) of this title, among other goals, to better understand and combat the transnational trade in illegal wildlife.

(Pub. L. 114–231, title IV, §402, Oct. 7, 2016, 130 Stat. 954.)

§7643. Engagement of United States diplomatic missions

As soon as practicable but not later than 2 years after October 7, 2016, each chief of mission to a focus country should begin to implement the recommendations contained in the strategic plan required under section 7631(a)(2) of this title, among other goals, for the country.

(Pub. L. 114–231, title IV, §403, Oct. 7, 2016, 130 Stat. 955.)

§7644. Community conservation

The Secretary of State, in collaboration with the United State Agency for International Development, heads of other relevant United States agencies, the private sector, nongovernmental organizations, and other development partners, may provide support in focus countries to carry out the recommendations made in the strategic plan required under section 7631(a)(2) of this title as such recommendations relate to the development, scaling, and replication of community wildlife conservancies and community conservation programs in focus countries to assist with rural stability and greater security for people and wildlife, empower and support communities to manage or benefit from their wildlife resources in a long-term biologically viable manner, and reduce the threat of poaching and trafficking, including through—

(1) promoting conservation-based enterprises and incentives, such as eco-tourism and stewardship-oriented agricultural production, that empower communities to manage wildlife, natural resources, and community ventures where appropriate, by ensuring they benefit from well-managed wildlife populations;

(2) helping create alternative livelihoods to poaching by mitigating wildlife trafficking, helping support rural stability, greater security for people and wildlife, responsible economic development, and economic incentives to conserve wildlife populations;

(3) engaging regional businesses and the private sector to develop goods and services to aid in anti-poaching and anti-trafficking measures;

(4) working with communities to develop secure and safe methods of sharing information with enforcement officials;

(5) providing technical assistance to support land use stewardship plans to improve the economic, environmental, and social outcomes in community-owned or -managed lands;

(6) supporting community anti-poaching efforts, including policing and informant networks;

(7) working with community and national governments to develop relevant policy and regulatory frameworks to enable and promote community conservation programs, including supporting law enforcement engagement with wildlife protection authorities to promote information-sharing; and

(8) working with national governments to ensure that communities have timely and effective support from national authorities to mitigate risks that communities may face when engaging in anti-poaching and anti-trafficking activities.

(Pub. L. 114–231, title IV, §404, Oct. 7, 2016, 130 Stat. 955.)