[USC02] 54 USC Ch. 3121: NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION IN THE UNITED STATES
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54 USC Ch. 3121: NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION IN THE UNITED STATES
From Title 54—NATIONAL PARK SERVICE AND RELATED PROGRAMSSubtitle III—National Preservation ProgramsDIVISION B—ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

CHAPTER 3121—NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION IN THE UNITED STATES

Sec.
312101.
Definitions.
312102.
Establishment and purposes.
312103.
Principal office.
312104.
Board of trustees.
312105.
Powers.
312106.
Consultation with National Park System Advisory Board.

        

§312101. Definitions

In this chapter:

(1) Board.—The term "Board" means the board of trustees of the National Trust.

(2) National trust.—The term "National Trust" means the National Trust for Historic Preservation in the United States established under section 312102 of this title.

(Pub. L. 113–287, §3, Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3249.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised

Section

Source (U.S. Code)Source (Statutes at Large)
312101 no source.

§312102. Establishment and purposes

(a) Establishment.—To further the policy enunciated in chapter 3201 of this title, and to facilitate public participation in the preservation of sites, buildings, and objects of national significance or interest, there is established a charitable, educational, and nonprofit corporation to be known as the National Trust for Historic Preservation in the United States.

(b) Purposes.—The purposes of the National Trust shall be to—

(1) receive donations of sites, buildings, and objects significant in American history and culture;

(2) preserve and administer the sites, buildings, and objects for public benefit;

(3) accept, hold, and administer gifts of money, securities, or other property of any character for the purpose of carrying out the preservation program; and

(4) execute other functions vested in the National Trust by this chapter.

(Pub. L. 113–287, §3, Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3249.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised

Section

Source (U.S. Code)Source (Statutes at Large)
312102 16 U.S.C. 468. Oct. 26, 1949, ch. 735, §1, 63 Stat. 927.

§312103. Principal office

The National Trust shall have its principal office in the District of Columbia and shall be deemed, for purposes of venue in civil actions, to be a resident of the District of Columbia. The National Trust may establish offices in other places as it may consider necessary or appropriate in the conduct of its business.

(Pub. L. 113–287, §3, Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3249.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised

Section

Source (U.S. Code)Source (Statutes at Large)
312103 16 U.S.C. 468a. Oct. 26, 1949, ch. 735, §2, 63 Stat. 927.

The words "inhabitant and" are omitted as unnecessary.

§312104. Board of trustees

(a) Membership.—The affairs of the National Trust shall be under the general direction of a board of trustees composed as follows:

(1) The Attorney General, the Secretary, and the Director of the National Gallery of Art, ex officio.

(2) Not fewer than 6 general trustees who shall be citizens of the United States.


(b) Designation of Another Officer.—The Attorney General and the Secretary, when it appears desirable in the interest of the conduct of the business of the Board and to such extent as they consider it advisable, may, by written notice to the National Trust, designate any officer of their respective departments to act for them in the discharge of their duties as a member of the Board.

(c) General Trustees.—

(1) Number and selection.—The number of general trustees shall be fixed by the Board and shall be chosen by the members of the National Trust from its members at any regular meeting of the National Trust.

(2) Term of office.—The respective terms of office of the general trustees shall be as prescribed by the Board but in no case shall exceed a period of 5 years from the date of election.

(3) Successor.—A successor to a general trustee shall be chosen in the same manner and shall have a term expiring 5 years from the date of the expiration of the term for which the predecessor was chosen, except that a successor chosen to fill a vacancy occurring prior to the expiration of a term shall be chosen only for the remainder of that term.


(d) Chairman.—The chairman of the Board shall be elected by a majority vote of the members of the Board.

(e) Compensation and Reimbursement.—No compensation shall be paid to the members of the Board for their services as such members, but they shall be reimbursed for travel and actual expenses necessarily incurred by them in attending board meetings and performing other official duties on behalf of the National Trust at the direction of the Board.

(Pub. L. 113–287, §3, Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3249.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised

Section

Source (U.S. Code)Source (Statutes at Large)
312104 16 U.S.C. 468b. Oct. 26, 1949, ch. 735, §3, 63 Stat. 928; July 28, 1953, ch. 255, 67 Stat. 228.

§312105. Powers

(a) In General.—To the extent necessary to enable it to carry out the functions vested in it by this chapter, the National Trust has the general powers described in this section.

(b) Succession.—The National Trust has succession until dissolved by Act of Congress, in which event title to the property of the National Trust, both real and personal, shall, insofar as consistent with existing contractual obligations and subject to all other legally enforceable claims or demands by or against the National Trust, pass to and become vested in the United States.

(c) Sue and Be Sued.—The National Trust may sue and be sued in its corporate name.

(d) Corporate Seal.—The National Trust may adopt, alter, and use a corporate seal that shall be judicially noticed.

(e) Constitution, Bylaws, and Regulations.—The National Trust may adopt a constitution and prescribe such bylaws and regulations, not inconsistent with the laws of the United States or of any State, as it considers necessary for the administration of its functions under this chapter, including among other matters, bylaws and regulations governing visitation to historic properties, administration of corporate funds, and the organization and procedure of the Board.

(f) Personal Property.—The National Trust may accept, hold, and administer gifts and bequests of money, securities, or other personal property of any character, absolutely or in trust, for the purposes for which the National Trust is created. Unless otherwise restricted by the terms of a gift or bequest, the National Trust may sell, exchange, or otherwise dispose of, and invest or reinvest in investments as it may determine from time to time, the moneys, securities, or other property given or bequeathed to it. The principal of corporate funds and the income from those funds and all other revenues received by the National Trust from any source shall be placed in such depositories as the National Trust shall determine and shall be subject to expenditure by the National Trust for its corporate purposes.

(g) Real Property.—The National Trust may acquire by gift, devise, purchase, or otherwise, absolutely or in trust, and hold and, unless otherwise restricted by the terms of the gift or devise, encumber, convey, or otherwise dispose of, any real property, or any estate or interest in real property (except property within the exterior boundaries of a System unit), as may be necessary and proper in carrying into effect the purposes of the National Trust.

(h) Contracts and Cooperative Agreements Respecting Protection, Preservation, Maintenance, or Operation.—The National Trust may contract and make cooperative agreements with Federal, State, or local agencies, corporations, associations, or individuals, under terms and conditions that the National Trust considers advisable, respecting the protection, preservation, maintenance, or operation of any historic site, building, object, or property used in connection with the site, building, object, or property for public use, regardless of whether the National Trust has acquired title to the property, or any interest in the property.

(i) Enter Into Contracts and Execute Instruments.—The National Trust may enter into contracts generally and execute all instruments necessary or appropriate to carry out its corporate purposes, including concession contracts, leases, or permits for the use of land, buildings, or other property considered desirable either to accommodate the public or to facilitate administration.

(j) Officers, Agents, and Employees.—The National Trust may appoint and prescribe the duties of officers, agents, and employees as may be necessary to carry out its functions, and fix and pay compensation to them for their services as the National Trust may determine.

(k) Lawful Acts.—The National Trust may generally do any and all lawful acts necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes for which the National Trust is created.

(Pub. L. 113–287, §3, Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3250.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised

Section

Source (U.S. Code)Source (Statutes at Large)
312105 16 U.S.C. 468c. Oct. 26, 1949, ch. 735, §4, 63 Stat. 928.

In subsection (h), the words "local agencies" are substituted for "municipal departments or agencies" for consistency in the revised title and with other titles of the United States Code.

§312106. Consultation with National Park System Advisory Board

In carrying out its functions under this chapter, the National Trust may consult with the National Park System Advisory Board on matters relating to the selection of sites, buildings, and objects to be preserved and protected pursuant to this chapter.

(Pub. L. 113–287, §3, Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3251.)

Historical and Revision Notes
Revised

Section

Source (U.S. Code)Source (Statutes at Large)
312106 16 U.S.C. 468d. Oct. 26, 1949, ch. 735, §5, 63 Stat. 929.

The words "National Park System Advisory Board" are substituted for "Advisory Board on National Parks, Historic Sites, Buildings, and Museums" because the Board was renamed when section 3 of the Act of August 21, 1935 (known as the Historic Sites, Buildings, and Antiquities Act (ch. 593, 49 Stat. 667)) was amended by section 9 of Public Law 91–383, as added by section 2 of Public Law 94–458 (90 Stat. 1940).