[USC02] 6 USC CHAPTER 3, SUBCHAPTER II, Part A: General Provisions
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6 USC CHAPTER 3, SUBCHAPTER II, Part A: General Provisions
From Title 6—DOMESTIC SECURITYCHAPTER 3—SECURITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY FOR EVERY PORTSUBCHAPTER II—SECURITY OF THE INTERNATIONAL SUPPLY CHAIN

Part A—General Provisions

§941. Strategic plan to enhance the security of the international supply chain

(a) Strategic plan

The Secretary, in consultation with appropriate Federal, State, local, and tribal government agencies and private sector stakeholders responsible for security matters that affect or relate to the movement of containers through the international supply chain, shall develop, implement, and update, triennially, a strategic plan to enhance the security of the international supply chain.

(b) Requirements

The strategic plan required under subsection (a) shall—

(1) describe the roles, responsibilities, and authorities of Federal, State, local, and tribal government agencies and private-sector stakeholders that relate to the security of the movement of containers through the international supply chain;

(2) identify and address gaps and unnecessary overlaps in the roles, responsibilities, or authorities described in paragraph (1);

(3) identify and make recommendations regarding legislative, regulatory, and organizational changes necessary to improve coordination among the entities or to enhance the security of the international supply chain;

(4) provide measurable goals, including objectives, mechanisms, and a schedule, for furthering the security of commercial operations from point of origin to point of destination;

(5) build on available resources and consider costs and benefits;

(6) provide incentives for additional voluntary measures to enhance cargo security, as recommended by the Commissioner;

(7) consider the impact of supply chain security requirements on small- and medium-sized companies;

(8) include a process for sharing intelligence and information with private-sector stakeholders to assist in their security efforts;

(9) identify a framework for prudent and measured response in the event of a transportation security incident involving the international supply chain;

(10) provide protocols for the expeditious resumption of the flow of trade in accordance with section 942 of this title;

(11) consider the linkages between supply chain security and security programs within other systems of movement, including travel security and terrorism finance programs; and

(12) expand upon and relate to existing strategies and plans, including the National Response Plan, the National Maritime Transportation Security Plan, the National Strategy for Maritime Security, and the 8 supporting plans of the Strategy, as required by Homeland Security Presidential Directive 13.

(c) Consultation

In developing protocols under subsection (b)(10), the Secretary shall consult with Federal, State, local, and private sector stakeholders, including the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee and the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee.

(d) Communication

To the extent practicable, the strategic plan developed under subsection (a) shall provide for coordination with, and lines of communication among, appropriate Federal, State, local, and private-sector stakeholders on law enforcement actions, intermodal rerouting plans, and other strategic infrastructure issues resulting from a transportation security incident or transportation disruption.

(e) Utilization of Advisory Committees

As part of the consultations described in subsection (a), the Secretary shall, to the extent practicable, utilize the Homeland Security Advisory Committee, the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee, and the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee to review, as necessary, the draft strategic plan and any subsequent updates to the strategic plan.

(f) International standards and practices

In furtherance of the strategic plan required under subsection (a), the Secretary is encouraged to consider proposed or established standards and practices of foreign governments and international organizations, including the International Maritime Organization, the World Customs Organization, the International Labor Organization, and the International Organization for Standardization, as appropriate, to establish standards and best practices for the security of containers moving through the international supply chain.

(g) Reports

(1) Initial report

Not later than 270 days after October 13, 2006, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report that contains the strategic plan required by subsection (a).

(2) Updates

Not later than 270 days after October 5, 2018, and triennially thereafter, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report that contains any updates to the strategic plan under subsection (a) since the prior report.

(Pub. L. 109–347, title II, §201, Oct. 13, 2006, 120 Stat. 1901; Pub. L. 115–254, div. J, §1804, Oct. 5, 2018, 132 Stat. 3533.)

Amendments

2018—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 115–254, §1804(1), substituted "triennially" for "as appropriate".

Subsec. (g). Pub. L. 115–254, §1804(2)(A), substituted "Reports" for "Report" in heading.

Subsec. (g)(2). Pub. L. 115–254, §1804(2)(B), amended par. (2) generally. Prior to amendment, text read as follows: "Not later than 3 years after the date on which the strategic plan is submitted under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that contains an update of the strategic plan."

§942. Post-incident resumption of trade

(a) In general

The Secretary shall develop and update, as necessary, protocols for the resumption of trade in accordance with section 941(b)(10) of this title in the event of a transportation disruption or a transportation security incident. The protocols shall include—

(1) the identification of the appropriate initial incident commander, if the Commandant of the Coast Guard is not the appropriate person, and lead departments, agencies, or offices to execute such protocols;

(2) a plan to redeploy resources and personnel, as necessary, to reestablish the flow of trade;

(3) a plan to provide training for the periodic instruction of personnel of the United States Customs and Border Protection, the Coast Guard, and the Transportation Security Administration in trade resumption functions and responsibilities; and

(4) appropriate factors for establishing prioritization of vessels and cargo determined by the President to be critical for response and recovery, including factors relating to public health, national security, and economic need.

(b) Vessels

In determining the prioritization of vessels accessing facilities (as defined under section 70101 of title 46), the Commandant of the Coast Guard may, to the extent practicable and consistent with the protocols and plans required under this section to ensure the safe and secure transit of vessels to ports in the United States after a transportation security incident, give priority to a vessel—

(1) that has an approved security plan under section 70103(c) of title 46 or a valid international ship security certificate, as provided under part 104 of title 33, Code of Federal Regulations;

(2) that is manned by individuals who are described in section 70105(b)(2)(B) of title 46; and

(3) that is operated by validated participants in the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism program.

(c) Cargo

In determining the prioritization of the resumption of the flow of cargo and consistent with the protocols established under this section, the Commissioner may give preference to cargo—

(1) entering a port of entry directly from a foreign seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative;

(2) from the supply chain of a validated C–TPAT participant and other private sector entities, as appropriate; or

(3) that has undergone—

(A) a nuclear or radiological detection scan;

(B) an x-ray, density, or other imaging scan; and

(C) a system to positively identify the container at the last port of departure prior to arrival in the United States, which data has been evaluated and analyzed by personnel of the United States Customs and Border Protection.

(d) Coordination

The Secretary shall ensure that there is appropriate coordination among the Commandant of the Coast Guard, the Commissioner, and other Federal officials following a maritime disruption or maritime transportation security incident in order to provide for the resumption of trade.

(e) Communication

Consistent with section 941 of this title, the Commandant of the Coast Guard, Commissioner, and other appropriate Federal officials, shall promptly communicate any revised procedures or instructions intended for the private sector following a maritime disruption or maritime transportation security incident.

(Pub. L. 109–347, title II, §202, Oct. 13, 2006, 120 Stat. 1903.)

§943. Automated Targeting System

(a) In general

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall—

(1) identify and seek the submission of data related to the movement of a shipment of cargo through the international supply chain; and

(2) analyze the data described in paragraph (1) to identify high-risk cargo for inspection.

(b) Requirement

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall require the electronic transmission to the Department of additional data elements for improved high-risk targeting, including appropriate security elements of entry data, as determined by the Secretary, to be provided as advanced information with respect to cargo destined for importation into the United States prior to loading of such cargo on vessels at foreign seaports.

(c) Consideration

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall—

(1) consider the cost, benefit, and feasibility of—

(A) requiring additional nonmanifest documentation;

(B) reducing the time period allowed by law for revisions to a container cargo manifest;

(C) reducing the time period allowed by law for submission of certain elements of entry data, for vessel or cargo; and

(D) such other actions the Secretary considers beneficial for improving the information relied upon for the Automated Targeting System and any successor targeting system in furthering the security and integrity of the international supply chain; and


(2) consult with stakeholders, including the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee, and identify to them the need for such information, and the appropriate timing of its submission.

(d) Regulations

The Secretary shall promulgate regulations to carry out this section. In promulgating such regulations, the Secretary shall adhere to the parameters applicable to the development of regulations under section 343(a) of the Trade Act of 2002 (19 U.S.C. 2071 note),1 including provisions relating to consultation, technology, analysis, use of information, confidentiality, and timing requirements.

(e) System improvements

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall—

(1) conduct, through an independent panel, a review of the effectiveness and capabilities of the Automated Targeting System;

(2) consider future iterations of the Automated Targeting System, which would incorporate smart features, such as more complex algorithms and real-time intelligence, instead of relying solely on rule sets that are periodically updated;

(3) ensure that the Automated Targeting System has the capability to electronically compare manifest and other available data for cargo entered into or bound for the United States to detect any significant anomalies between such data and facilitate the resolution of such anomalies;

(4) ensure that the Automated Targeting System has the capability to electronically identify, compile, and compare select data elements for cargo entered into or bound for the United States following a maritime transportation security incident, in order to efficiently identify cargo for increased inspection or expeditious release; and

(5) develop a schedule to address the recommendations of the Comptroller General of the United States, the Inspector General of the Department of the Treasury, and the Inspector General of the Department with respect to the operation of the Automated Targeting System.

(f) Secure transmission of certain information

All information required by the Department from supply chain partners shall be transmitted in a secure fashion, as determined by the Secretary, so as to protect the information from unauthorized access.

(g) Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated to the United States Customs and Border Protection to carry out the Automated Targeting System for identifying high-risk oceanborne container cargo for inspection—

(1) $33,200,000 for fiscal year 2008;

(2) $35,700,000 for fiscal year 2009; and

(3) $37,485,000 for fiscal year 2010.

(Pub. L. 109–347, title II, §203, Oct. 13, 2006, 120 Stat. 1904.)

References in Text

Section 343(a) of the Trade Act of 2002, referred to in subsec. (d), is section 343(a) of Pub. L. 107–210, which was set out as a note under section 2071 of Title 19, Customs Duties, prior to editorial transfer to section 1415(a) of Title 19.

1 See References in Text note below.

§944. Container security standards and procedures

(a) Establishment

(1) In general

Not later than 90 days after October 13, 2006, the Secretary shall initiate a rulemaking proceeding to establish minimum standards and procedures for securing containers in transit to the United States.

(2) Interim rule

Not later than 180 days after October 13, 2006, the Secretary shall issue an interim final rule pursuant to the proceeding described in paragraph (1).

(3) Missed deadline

If the Secretary is unable to meet the deadline established pursuant to paragraph (2), the Secretary shall submit a letter to the appropriate congressional committees explaining why the Secretary is unable to meet that deadline and describing what must be done before such minimum standards and procedures can be established.

(4) Deadline for enforcement

(A) Enforcement of rule

Not later than 2 years after the date on which the standards and procedures are established pursuant to paragraph (1), all containers bound for ports of entry in the United States shall meet such standards and procedures.

(B) Interim requirement

If the interim final rule described in paragraph (2) is not issued by April 1, 2008, then—

(i) effective not later than October 15, 2008, all containers in transit to the United States shall be required to meet the requirements of International Organization for Standardization Publicly Available Specification 17712 standard for sealing containers; and

(ii) the requirements of this subparagraph shall cease to be effective upon the effective date of the interim final rule issued pursuant to this subsection.

(b) Review and enhancement

The Secretary shall regularly review and enhance the standards and procedures established pursuant to subsection (a), as appropriate, based on tests of technologies as they become commercially available to detect container intrusion and the highest consequence threats, particularly weapons of mass destruction.

(c) International cargo security standards

The Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Energy, and other Federal Government officials, as appropriate, and with the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee, the Homeland Security Advisory Committee, and the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee, is encouraged to promote and establish international standards for the security of containers moving through the international supply chain with foreign governments and international organizations, including the International Maritime Organization, the International Organization for Standardization, the International Labor Organization, and the World Customs Organization.

(d) International trade and other obligations

In carrying out this section, the Secretary shall consult with appropriate Federal departments and agencies and private sector stakeholders and ensure that actions under this section do not violate international trade obligations or other international obligations of the United States.

(Pub. L. 109–347, title II, §204, Oct. 13, 2006, 120 Stat. 1905; Pub. L. 110–53, title XVII, §1701(b), Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 491.)

Amendments

2007—Subsec. (a)(4). Pub. L. 110–53, which directed amendment of par. (4) by substituting "(1) Deadline for enforcement" and subpar. (A) designation and heading for "(1) Deadline for enforcement", was executed by inserting the subpar. (A) designation and heading before "Not later than" and making no change in the par. designation or heading, to reflect the probable intent of Congress.

Subsec. (a)(4)(B). Pub. L. 110–53, §1701(b)(2), added subpar. (B).

§945. Container Security Initiative

(a) Establishment

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall establish and implement a program (referred to in this section as the "Container Security Initiative" or "CSI") to identify and examine or search maritime containers that pose a security risk before loading such containers in a foreign port for shipment to the United States, either directly or through a foreign port.

(b) Assessment

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, may designate foreign seaports to participate in the Container Security Initiative after the Secretary has assessed the costs, benefits, and other factors associated with such designation, including—

(1) the level of risk for the potential compromise of containers by terrorists, or other threats as determined by the Secretary;

(2) the volume of cargo being imported to the United States directly from, or being transshipped through, the foreign seaport;

(3) the results of the Coast Guard assessments conducted pursuant to section 70108 of title 46;

(4) the commitment of the government of the country in which the foreign seaport is located to cooperating with the Department in sharing critical data and risk management information and to maintain programs to ensure employee integrity; and

(5) the potential for validation of security practices at the foreign seaport by the Department.

(c) Notification

The Secretary shall notify the appropriate congressional committees of the designation of a foreign port under the Container Security Initiative or the revocation of such a designation before notifying the public of such designation or revocation.

(d) Negotiations

The Secretary, in cooperation with the Secretary of State and in consultation with the United States Trade Representative, may enter into negotiations with the government of each foreign nation in which a seaport is designated under the Container Security Initiative to ensure full compliance with the requirements under the Container Security Initiative.

(e) Overseas inspections

(1) Requirements and procedures

The Secretary shall—

(A) establish minimum technical capability criteria and standard operating procedures for the use of nonintrusive inspection and nuclear and radiological detection systems in conjunction with CSI;

(B) require each port designated under CSI to operate nonintrusive inspection and nuclear and radiological detection systems in accordance with the technical capability criteria and standard operating procedures established under subparagraph (A);

(C) continually monitor the technologies, processes, and techniques used to inspect cargo at ports designated under CSI to ensure adherence to such criteria and the use of such procedures; and

(D) consult with the Secretary of Energy in establishing the minimum technical capability criteria and standard operating procedures established under subparagraph (A) pertaining to radiation detection technologies to promote consistency in detection systems at foreign ports designated under CSI.

(2) Constraints

The criteria and procedures established under paragraph (1)(A)—

(A) shall be consistent, as practicable, with relevant standards and procedures utilized by other Federal departments or agencies, or developed by international bodies if the United States consents to such standards and procedures;

(B) shall not apply to activities conducted under the Megaports Initiative of the Department of Energy; and

(C) shall not be designed to endorse the product or technology of any specific company or to conflict with the sovereignty of a country in which a foreign seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative is located.

(f) Savings provision

The authority of the Secretary under this section shall not affect any authority or duplicate any efforts or responsibilities of the Federal Government with respect to the deployment of radiation detection equipment outside of the United States.

(g) Coordination

The Secretary shall—

(1) coordinate with the Secretary of Energy, as necessary, to provide radiation detection equipment required to support the Container Security Initiative through the Department of Energy's Second Line of Defense Program and Megaports Initiative; or

(2) work with the private sector or host governments, when possible, to obtain radiation detection equipment that meets the Department's and the Department of Energy's technical specifications for such equipment.

(h) Staffing

The Secretary shall develop a human capital management plan to determine adequate staffing levels in the United States and in foreign seaports including, as appropriate, the remote location of personnel in countries in which foreign seaports are designated under the Container Security Initiative.

(i) Annual discussions

The Secretary, in coordination with the appropriate Federal officials, shall hold annual discussions with foreign governments of countries in which foreign seaports designated under the Container Security Initiative are located regarding best practices, technical assistance, training needs, and technological developments that will assist in ensuring the efficient and secure movement of international cargo.

(j) Lesser risk port

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, may treat cargo loaded in a foreign seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative as presenting a lesser risk than similar cargo loaded in a foreign seaport that is not designated under the Container Security Initiative, for the purpose of clearing such cargo into the United States.

(k) Prohibition

(1) In general

The Secretary shall issue a "do not load" order, using existing authorities, to prevent the onload of any cargo loaded at a port designated under CSI that has been identified as high risk, including by the Automated Targeting System, unless the cargo is determined to no longer be high risk through—

(A) a scan of the cargo with nonintrusive imaging equipment and radiation detection equipment;

(B) a search of the cargo; or

(C) additional information received by the Department.

(2) Rule of construction

Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to interfere with the ability of the Secretary to deny entry of any cargo into the United States.

(l) Report

Not later than 270 days after October 5, 2018, the Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall, in consultation with other appropriate government officials and the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee, submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on the effectiveness of, and the need for any improvements to, the Container Security Initiative. The report shall include—

(1) a description of the technical assistance delivered to, as well as needed at, each designated seaport;

(2) a description of the human capital management plan at each designated seaport;

(3) a summary of the requests made by the United States to foreign governments to conduct physical or nonintrusive inspections of cargo at designated seaports, and whether each such request was granted or denied by the foreign government;

(4) an assessment of the effectiveness of screening, scanning, and inspection protocols and technologies utilized at designated seaports and the effect on the flow of commerce at such seaports, as well as any recommendations for improving the effectiveness of screening, scanning, and inspection protocols and technologies utilized at designated seaports;

(5) a description and assessment of the outcome of any security incident involving a foreign seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative;

(6) the rationale for the continuance of each port designated under CSI;

(7) a description of the potential for remote targeting to decrease the number of personnel who are deployed at foreign ports under CSI; and

(8) a summary and assessment of the aggregate number and extent of trade compliance lapses at each seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative.

(m) Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated to the United States Customs and Border Protection to carry out the provisions of this section—

(1) $144,000,000 for fiscal year 2008;

(2) $146,000,000 for fiscal year 2009; and

(3) $153,300,000 for fiscal year 2010.

(Pub. L. 109–347, title II, §205, Oct. 13, 2006, 120 Stat. 1906; Pub. L. 115–254, div. J, §1812, Oct. 5, 2018, 132 Stat. 3539.)

Amendments

2018—Subsec. (l). Pub. L. 115–254 struck out par. (1) designation and heading, substituted "Not later than 270 days after October 5, 2018," for "Not later than September 30, 2007," in introductory provisions, redesignated subpars. (A) to (H) of former par. (1) as pars. (1) to (8), respectively, and struck out former par. (2). Prior to amendment, text of par. (2) read as follows: "Not later than September 30, 2010, the Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall, in consultation with other appropriate government officials and the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee, submit an updated report to the appropriate congressional committees on the effectiveness of, and the need for any improvements to, the Container Security Initiative. The updated report shall address each of the elements required to be included in the report provided for under paragraph (1)."

International Port and Facility Inspection Coordination

Pub. L. 111–281, title VIII, §825, Oct. 15, 2010, 124 Stat. 3004, as amended by Pub. L. 114–120, title III, §320, Feb. 8, 2016, 130 Stat. 66, provided that:

"(a) Coordination.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall, to the extent practicable, conduct the assessments required by the following provisions of law concurrently, or develop a process by which the assessments are coordinated between the Coast Guard and Customs and Border Protection:

"(1) Section 205 of the SAFE Port Act (6 U.S.C. 945).

"(2) Section 213 of that Act (6 U.S.C. 964 [963]).

"(3) Section 70108 of title 46, United States Code.

"(b) Limitation.—Nothing in subsection (a) shall be construed to affect or diminish the Secretary's authority or discretion—

"(1) to conduct an assessment of a foreign port at any time;

"(2) to compel the Secretary to conduct an assessment of a foreign port so as to ensure that 2 or more assessments are conducted concurrently; or

"(3) to cancel an assessment of a foreign port if the Secretary is unable to conduct 2 or more assessments concurrently.

"(c) Multiple Assessment Report.—The Secretary shall provide written notice to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate and the Committees on Transportation and Infrastructure and Homeland Security of the House of Representatives whenever the Secretary conducts 2 or more assessments of the same port within a 3-year period."